Young People Who Meaningfully Improve Are More Likely to Mutually Agree to End Treatment

Julian Edbrooke-Childs*, Luís Costa da Silva, Anja Čuš, Shaun Liverpool, Catarina Pinheiro Mota, Giada Pietrabissa, Thomas Bardsley, Celia M. D. Sales, Randi Ulberg, Jenna Jacob, Nuno Ferreira

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objective: Symptom improvement is often examined as an indicator of a good outcome of accessing mental health services. However, there is little evidence of whether symptom improvement is associated with other indicators of a good outcome, such as a mutual agreement to end treatment. The aim of this study was to examine whether young people accessing mental health services who meaningfully improved were more likely to mutually agree to end treatment. Methods: Multilevel multinomial regression analysis controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, and referral source was conducted on N = 8,995 episodes of care [Female = 5,469, 61%; meanAge = 13.66 (SD = 2.87) years] using anonymised administrative data from young people's mental health services. Results: Compared to young people with no change in mental health difficulties, those showing positive meaningful changes in mental health difficulties were less likely to have case closure due to non-mutual agreement (Odds Ratio or OR = 0.58, 95% Confidence Interval or CI = 0.50–0.61). Similarly, they were less likely to transfer (OR = 0.61, 95% CI = 0.49–0.74) or end treatment for other reasons (OR = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.50–0.70) than by case closure due to mutual agreement. Conclusion: The findings suggest that young people accessing mental health services whose symptoms meaningfully improve are more likely to mutually agree to end treatment, adding to the evidence that symptom improvement may be appropriate to examine as an indicator of a good outcome of accessing mental health services.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)641770
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume12
Early online date6 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Psychology
  • youth
  • mental health
  • outcome
  • case closure
  • dropout
  • meaningful change

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Young People Who Meaningfully Improve Are More Likely to Mutually Agree to End Treatment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this