Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers

Katherine Knighting, Barbara Jack, Brenda Roe, Mary O'Brien, M Nolan, M Lloyd-Williams

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Background Informal family carers have vital roles caring for patients with cancer and advanced progressive illness, especially during the final year of life, which can incur an increasing burden compromising their physical and psychological health. Understanding how to prevent these stresses is vital to meeting the increasing demands for home-based care and to prevent inappropriate hospital admission of patients. Carers require regular assessment to alert health and social care professionals to their increasing level of burden and to trigger additional support. Aim The project has four phases which will culminate in the development and evaluation of an assessment thermometer to assess carers' needs. The thermometer will act as an alert indicator to the increasing burden experienced by carers in order to trigger referral of carers to appropriate support or services. Method The first phase of the project is an interview and focus group study with carers in Northwest England. Interviews will be conducted with carers who are currently supporting patients registered on the Gold Standard Framework or palliative care registers held by general practices in order to gather prospective data about carers' experiences and needs. These interviews will be conducted longitudinally where possible in order to capture the changing needs of the carers during the last 12 months of the patient's life. The focus groups will involve current and bereaved carers to capture a broader perspective on the issues faced. Resultsand conclusions The main themes identified from the interview and focus group study with carers will be presented, along with a discussion of the future development of the assessment thermometer.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Event9th Palliative Care Congress - The Sage, Gateshead, United Kingdom
Duration: 14 Mar 201216 Mar 2012

Conference

Conference9th Palliative Care Congress
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGateshead
Period14/03/1216/03/12

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Prospective Studies
Thermometers
Focus Groups
Interviews
Patient Admission
Home Care Services
Palliative Care
General Practice
England
Referral and Consultation
Psychology
Delivery of Health Care
Health

Cite this

Knighting, K., Jack, B., Roe, B., O'Brien, M., Nolan, M., & Lloyd-Williams, M. (2012). Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers. Poster session presented at 9th Palliative Care Congress, Gateshead, United Kingdom.
Knighting, Katherine ; Jack, Barbara ; Roe, Brenda ; O'Brien, Mary ; Nolan, M ; Lloyd-Williams, M. / Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers. Poster session presented at 9th Palliative Care Congress, Gateshead, United Kingdom.
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Knighting, K, Jack, B, Roe, B, O'Brien, M, Nolan, M & Lloyd-Williams, M 2012, 'Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers' 9th Palliative Care Congress, Gateshead, United Kingdom, 14/03/12 - 16/03/12, .

Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers. / Knighting, Katherine; Jack, Barbara; Roe, Brenda; O'Brien, Mary; Nolan, M; Lloyd-Williams, M.

2012. Poster session presented at 9th Palliative Care Congress, Gateshead, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers

AU - Knighting, Katherine

AU - Jack, Barbara

AU - Roe, Brenda

AU - O'Brien, Mary

AU - Nolan, M

AU - Lloyd-Williams, M

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Background Informal family carers have vital roles caring for patients with cancer and advanced progressive illness, especially during the final year of life, which can incur an increasing burden compromising their physical and psychological health. Understanding how to prevent these stresses is vital to meeting the increasing demands for home-based care and to prevent inappropriate hospital admission of patients. Carers require regular assessment to alert health and social care professionals to their increasing level of burden and to trigger additional support. Aim The project has four phases which will culminate in the development and evaluation of an assessment thermometer to assess carers' needs. The thermometer will act as an alert indicator to the increasing burden experienced by carers in order to trigger referral of carers to appropriate support or services. Method The first phase of the project is an interview and focus group study with carers in Northwest England. Interviews will be conducted with carers who are currently supporting patients registered on the Gold Standard Framework or palliative care registers held by general practices in order to gather prospective data about carers' experiences and needs. These interviews will be conducted longitudinally where possible in order to capture the changing needs of the carers during the last 12 months of the patient's life. The focus groups will involve current and bereaved carers to capture a broader perspective on the issues faced. Resultsand conclusions The main themes identified from the interview and focus group study with carers will be presented, along with a discussion of the future development of the assessment thermometer.

AB - Background Informal family carers have vital roles caring for patients with cancer and advanced progressive illness, especially during the final year of life, which can incur an increasing burden compromising their physical and psychological health. Understanding how to prevent these stresses is vital to meeting the increasing demands for home-based care and to prevent inappropriate hospital admission of patients. Carers require regular assessment to alert health and social care professionals to their increasing level of burden and to trigger additional support. Aim The project has four phases which will culminate in the development and evaluation of an assessment thermometer to assess carers' needs. The thermometer will act as an alert indicator to the increasing burden experienced by carers in order to trigger referral of carers to appropriate support or services. Method The first phase of the project is an interview and focus group study with carers in Northwest England. Interviews will be conducted with carers who are currently supporting patients registered on the Gold Standard Framework or palliative care registers held by general practices in order to gather prospective data about carers' experiences and needs. These interviews will be conducted longitudinally where possible in order to capture the changing needs of the carers during the last 12 months of the patient's life. The focus groups will involve current and bereaved carers to capture a broader perspective on the issues faced. Resultsand conclusions The main themes identified from the interview and focus group study with carers will be presented, along with a discussion of the future development of the assessment thermometer.

UR - http://spcare.bmj.com/

UR - http://www.pccongress.org.uk/

M3 - Poster

ER -

Knighting K, Jack B, Roe B, O'Brien M, Nolan M, Lloyd-Williams M. Who cares? A prospective study to develop an alert system for informal carers. 2012. Poster session presented at 9th Palliative Care Congress, Gateshead, United Kingdom.