What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project.

David Wooff, Dawne Bell, Chris Hughes

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

The work presented here serves to document the results of a national survey of in excess of one hundred and forty classroom practitioners and middle leaders about the current situation of textiles technology within their place of work. (School, Academy). Areas such as technological content, where textiles is actually delivered within the curriculum, the level to which it is delivered and the duration throughout the curriculum were all covered within this study. With recent national discussion centred the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (E.Bacc.) and the place of Design and Technology within any ensuing curriculum, textiles technology is facing an uncertain future. The work present here shows that in many secondary education settings textiles is being moved into “Art and Design” and away from “Design and Technology”. The research presented here also illustrates that a majority of textiles teachers are passionate about resisting the move from Design and Technology into Art and Design. Further, it is acknowledged by many that there is a place for textiles within Art and Design, particularly in relation to surface embellishment techniques but there is strong opinion of a need to retain its place within Design and Technology to cover technological textiles including garment construction.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 9 Jul 2011
EventDesign and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference - Keele University, United Kingdom
Duration: 1 Apr 2011 → …

Conference

ConferenceDesign and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period1/04/11 → …

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Wooff, D., Bell, D., & Hughes, C. (2011). What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project.. Poster session presented at Design and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference, United Kingdom.
Wooff, David ; Bell, Dawne ; Hughes, Chris. / What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project. Poster session presented at Design and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference, United Kingdom.
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Wooff, D, Bell, D & Hughes, C 2011, 'What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project.' Design and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference, United Kingdom, 1/04/11, .

What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project. / Wooff, David; Bell, Dawne; Hughes, Chris.

2011. Poster session presented at Design and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project.

AU - Wooff, David

AU - Bell, Dawne

AU - Hughes, Chris

PY - 2011/7/9

Y1 - 2011/7/9

N2 - The work presented here serves to document the results of a national survey of in excess of one hundred and forty classroom practitioners and middle leaders about the current situation of textiles technology within their place of work. (School, Academy). Areas such as technological content, where textiles is actually delivered within the curriculum, the level to which it is delivered and the duration throughout the curriculum were all covered within this study. With recent national discussion centred the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (E.Bacc.) and the place of Design and Technology within any ensuing curriculum, textiles technology is facing an uncertain future. The work present here shows that in many secondary education settings textiles is being moved into “Art and Design” and away from “Design and Technology”. The research presented here also illustrates that a majority of textiles teachers are passionate about resisting the move from Design and Technology into Art and Design. Further, it is acknowledged by many that there is a place for textiles within Art and Design, particularly in relation to surface embellishment techniques but there is strong opinion of a need to retain its place within Design and Technology to cover technological textiles including garment construction.

AB - The work presented here serves to document the results of a national survey of in excess of one hundred and forty classroom practitioners and middle leaders about the current situation of textiles technology within their place of work. (School, Academy). Areas such as technological content, where textiles is actually delivered within the curriculum, the level to which it is delivered and the duration throughout the curriculum were all covered within this study. With recent national discussion centred the introduction of the English Baccalaureate (E.Bacc.) and the place of Design and Technology within any ensuing curriculum, textiles technology is facing an uncertain future. The work present here shows that in many secondary education settings textiles is being moved into “Art and Design” and away from “Design and Technology”. The research presented here also illustrates that a majority of textiles teachers are passionate about resisting the move from Design and Technology into Art and Design. Further, it is acknowledged by many that there is a place for textiles within Art and Design, particularly in relation to surface embellishment techniques but there is strong opinion of a need to retain its place within Design and Technology to cover technological textiles including garment construction.

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Wooff D, Bell D, Hughes C. What do Textiles Teachers Really Think? The Findings of a National Research Pilot Project.. 2011. Poster session presented at Design and Technology Association Education and International Research Conference, United Kingdom.