Using participatory drama workshops to explore children's beliefs. understandings and experiences of coming to hospital for clinical procedures

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Children attending hospital for a clinical procedure such as a scan or
blood test can experience anxiety and uncertainty. Children who are
informed and supported before and during procedures tend to have a
more positive experience. Despite this there is a lack of empirical
evidence directly from children around how they would like to be
supported before, during and after a procedure. This qualitative study
used improvised drama workshops to investigate children’s (n=15, aged
7-14 years) perceptions and opinions of attending hospital for a
procedure and what would help them have a positive encounter. Children
portrayed themselves as having a small presence during a hospital
procedure; depicted by the two themes of ‘having to be brave but feeling
scared inside’ and ‘wanting to get involved but being too afraid to ask’.
Within both themes children described how the directive and reassuring
language and actions used by health professionals and parents
marginalised their contributions. This study shows that children
attending hospital for procedures value the opportunity to have a
presence and active role, to express their emotions, join in interactions
and be involved in making choices about their care.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Child Health Care
Early online date22 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 22 Oct 2019

Fingerprint

Drama
Education
Uncertainty
Emotions
Anxiety
Health

Keywords

  • children
  • procedures
  • involvement
  • decisions

Cite this

@article{dbf15f5997a04768b759300b7f915d3c,
title = "Using participatory drama workshops to explore children's beliefs. understandings and experiences of coming to hospital for clinical procedures",
abstract = "Children attending hospital for a clinical procedure such as a scan orblood test can experience anxiety and uncertainty. Children who areinformed and supported before and during procedures tend to have amore positive experience. Despite this there is a lack of empiricalevidence directly from children around how they would like to besupported before, during and after a procedure. This qualitative studyused improvised drama workshops to investigate children’s (n=15, aged7-14 years) perceptions and opinions of attending hospital for aprocedure and what would help them have a positive encounter. Childrenportrayed themselves as having a small presence during a hospitalprocedure; depicted by the two themes of ‘having to be brave but feelingscared inside’ and ‘wanting to get involved but being too afraid to ask’.Within both themes children described how the directive and reassuringlanguage and actions used by health professionals and parentsmarginalised their contributions. This study shows that childrenattending hospital for procedures value the opportunity to have apresence and active role, to express their emotions, join in interactionsand be involved in making choices about their care.",
keywords = "children, procedures, involvement, decisions",
author = "LUCY BRAY and EDMUND HOROWICZ and Kimberley Preston and BERNIE CARTER",
year = "2019",
month = "10",
day = "22",
doi = "10.1177/1367493519883087",
language = "English",
journal = "Journal of Child Health Care",
issn = "1367-4935",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using participatory drama workshops to explore children's beliefs. understandings and experiences of coming to hospital for clinical procedures

AU - BRAY, LUCY

AU - HOROWICZ, EDMUND

AU - Preston, Kimberley

AU - CARTER, BERNIE

PY - 2019/10/22

Y1 - 2019/10/22

N2 - Children attending hospital for a clinical procedure such as a scan orblood test can experience anxiety and uncertainty. Children who areinformed and supported before and during procedures tend to have amore positive experience. Despite this there is a lack of empiricalevidence directly from children around how they would like to besupported before, during and after a procedure. This qualitative studyused improvised drama workshops to investigate children’s (n=15, aged7-14 years) perceptions and opinions of attending hospital for aprocedure and what would help them have a positive encounter. Childrenportrayed themselves as having a small presence during a hospitalprocedure; depicted by the two themes of ‘having to be brave but feelingscared inside’ and ‘wanting to get involved but being too afraid to ask’.Within both themes children described how the directive and reassuringlanguage and actions used by health professionals and parentsmarginalised their contributions. This study shows that childrenattending hospital for procedures value the opportunity to have apresence and active role, to express their emotions, join in interactionsand be involved in making choices about their care.

AB - Children attending hospital for a clinical procedure such as a scan orblood test can experience anxiety and uncertainty. Children who areinformed and supported before and during procedures tend to have amore positive experience. Despite this there is a lack of empiricalevidence directly from children around how they would like to besupported before, during and after a procedure. This qualitative studyused improvised drama workshops to investigate children’s (n=15, aged7-14 years) perceptions and opinions of attending hospital for aprocedure and what would help them have a positive encounter. Childrenportrayed themselves as having a small presence during a hospitalprocedure; depicted by the two themes of ‘having to be brave but feelingscared inside’ and ‘wanting to get involved but being too afraid to ask’.Within both themes children described how the directive and reassuringlanguage and actions used by health professionals and parentsmarginalised their contributions. This study shows that childrenattending hospital for procedures value the opportunity to have apresence and active role, to express their emotions, join in interactionsand be involved in making choices about their care.

KW - children

KW - procedures

KW - involvement

KW - decisions

U2 - 10.1177/1367493519883087

DO - 10.1177/1367493519883087

M3 - Article

JO - Journal of Child Health Care

JF - Journal of Child Health Care

SN - 1367-4935

ER -