To Believe, To Think, To Know…To Teach? Ethical Deliberation in Teacher-Education

Damien Shortt, Paul Reynolds, Mary McAteer, Fiona Hallett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The interest in ethical deliberation in teacher education goes back a number of years to around 2009, when organisation then responsible for teachers' personal and professional conduct in England, the General Teaching Council of England (GTCE), was in process of preparing a new Code of Conduct. The topicality of research focus was greatly enhanced in 2010 when a new government came to power in England promising to change radically entire teaching profession. Unlike all previous incarnations of official teaching standards in England, these new standards also included a section covering personal and professional conduct, meaning that teaching and facilitation of ethical deliberation in teacher education has arguably become more important than it has ever been before. It is this government policy landscape that provides background for interest in the promotion of ethical deliberation in teacher training and why one feels it is becoming an increasingly important area of education studies.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPhilosophical Perspectives on Teacher Education
EditorsRuth Heilbronn, Lorraine Foreman-Peck
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
Pages89-108
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9781118977668
ISBN (Print)9781118977859
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2015

Keywords

  • England
  • Ethical deliberation
  • General Teaching Council of England (GTCE)
  • Teacher education

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