The reproducibility of 4 km time trial (TT) performance following individualised sodium bicarbonate supplementation; a randomised controlled trial in trained cyclists

Lewis Gough, Sanjoy Deb, Andy Sparks, Lars McNaughton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
55 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Individual time to peak blood bicarbonate (HCO 3 ) has demonstrated good to excellent reproducibility following ingestion of both 0.2 g kg −1 body mass (BM) and 0.3 g kg −1 BM sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3), but the consistency of the time trial (TT) performance response using such an individualised NaHCO 3 ingestion strategy remains unknown. This study therefore evaluated the reproducibility of 4-km TT performance following NaHCO 3 ingestion individualised to time to peak blood bicarbonate. Methods: Eleven trained male cyclists completed five randomised treatments with prior ingestion of 0.2 g kg −1 (SBC2) or 0.3 g kg −1 BM (SBC3) NaHCO 3, on two separate occasions each, or a control trial entailing no supplementation. Participants completed a 4-km cycling TT on a Velotron ergometer where time to complete, power and speed were measured, whilst acid-base blood parameters were also recorded (pH and blood bicarbonate concentration HCO 3 ) and lactate [La ]. Results: Alkalosis was achieved prior to exercise in both SBC2 and SBC3, as pH and HCO 3 were greater compared to baseline (p < 0.001), with no differences between treatments (p > 0.05). The reproducibility of the mean absolute change from baseline to peak in HCO 3 was good in SBC2 (r = 0.68) and excellent in SBC3 (r = 0.78). The performance responses following both SBC2 and SBC3 displayed excellent reproducibility (r range = 0.97 to 0.99). Conclusions: Results demonstrate excellent reproducibility of exercise performance following individualised NaHCO 3 ingestion, which is due to the high reproducibility of blood acid-base variables with repeat administration of NaHCO 3. Using a time to peak HCO 3 - strategy seems to cause no dose-dependent effects on performance for exercise of this duration and intensity; therefore, athletes may consider smaller doses of NaHCO 3 to mitigate gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort.

Original languageEnglish
Article number34
Pages (from-to)1-10
JournalSports Medicine - Open
Volume3
Issue number1
Early online date21 Sep 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • buffering
  • alkalosis
  • performance
  • acid base balance
  • ergogenic aids
  • reliability
  • Acid-base balance
  • Performance
  • Reliability
  • Ergogenic aids
  • Buffering
  • Alkalosis

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