The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Background: Providing service users with a say in their care is integral to UK government health policies. For patients dying of cancer there is an emphasis on giving choice regarding their preferred location for care, which includes the option of dying at home. Initiatives such as the End of Life Care Programme that promote patients choices including their preferred place of death the have been established However despite these policies the situation persists where patients are being admitted to hospital in the terminal phase of their illness when they have expressed a desire to die at home. Aim: The study aimed to investigate the views of community nurses involved in end of life care for people with cancer in an attempt to explore the factors that influence where they are cared for and ultimately die. Methodology: A qualitative study, using audio taperecorded focus group interviews was employed for the study. A purposive sample of 19 district nurses and community specialist palliative care nurses from across two primary care trusts in the North West of England participated in two focus groups. Data were analysed for emerging themes using thematic analysis. Results and discussion: The findings of this study suggest that poorly coordinated service provision impacts upon enabling patients with cancer, who wish to die at home to achieve this goal. Poor discharge planning from the hospital, including a lack of communication with the community nursing team, coupled with delays in commencing additional care services and the delivery of equipment are all identified as influencing factors. This paper discusses these findings and recommendations for improving the services offered to terminally ill cancer patients and their families will be given.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Event11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care - Vienna, Austria
Duration: 7 May 200910 May 2009

Conference

Conference11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care
CountryAustria
CityVienna
Period7/05/0910/05/09

Fingerprint

Terminal Care
Social Welfare
Focus Groups
Neoplasms
Nurses
Team Nursing
Terminally Ill
Health Policy
Palliative Care
Primary Health Care
Interviews
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

O'Brien, M., & Jack, B. (2009). The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer. Poster session presented at 11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care, Vienna, Austria.
O'Brien, M. ; Jack, B. / The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer. Poster session presented at 11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care, Vienna, Austria.
@conference{eba43ddd7afa4bf3a25cc62e409933f9,
title = "The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer",
abstract = "Background: Providing service users with a say in their care is integral to UK government health policies. For patients dying of cancer there is an emphasis on giving choice regarding their preferred location for care, which includes the option of dying at home. Initiatives such as the End of Life Care Programme that promote patients choices including their preferred place of death the have been established However despite these policies the situation persists where patients are being admitted to hospital in the terminal phase of their illness when they have expressed a desire to die at home. Aim: The study aimed to investigate the views of community nurses involved in end of life care for people with cancer in an attempt to explore the factors that influence where they are cared for and ultimately die. Methodology: A qualitative study, using audio taperecorded focus group interviews was employed for the study. A purposive sample of 19 district nurses and community specialist palliative care nurses from across two primary care trusts in the North West of England participated in two focus groups. Data were analysed for emerging themes using thematic analysis. Results and discussion: The findings of this study suggest that poorly coordinated service provision impacts upon enabling patients with cancer, who wish to die at home to achieve this goal. Poor discharge planning from the hospital, including a lack of communication with the community nursing team, coupled with delays in commencing additional care services and the delivery of equipment are all identified as influencing factors. This paper discusses these findings and recommendations for improving the services offered to terminally ill cancer patients and their families will be given.",
author = "M. O'Brien and B. Jack",
year = "2009",
language = "English",
note = "11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care ; Conference date: 07-05-2009 Through 10-05-2009",

}

O'Brien, M & Jack, B 2009, 'The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer' 11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care, Vienna, Austria, 7/05/09 - 10/05/09, .

The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer. / O'Brien, M.; Jack, B.

2009. Poster session presented at 11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care, Vienna, Austria.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer

AU - O'Brien, M.

AU - Jack, B.

PY - 2009

Y1 - 2009

N2 - Background: Providing service users with a say in their care is integral to UK government health policies. For patients dying of cancer there is an emphasis on giving choice regarding their preferred location for care, which includes the option of dying at home. Initiatives such as the End of Life Care Programme that promote patients choices including their preferred place of death the have been established However despite these policies the situation persists where patients are being admitted to hospital in the terminal phase of their illness when they have expressed a desire to die at home. Aim: The study aimed to investigate the views of community nurses involved in end of life care for people with cancer in an attempt to explore the factors that influence where they are cared for and ultimately die. Methodology: A qualitative study, using audio taperecorded focus group interviews was employed for the study. A purposive sample of 19 district nurses and community specialist palliative care nurses from across two primary care trusts in the North West of England participated in two focus groups. Data were analysed for emerging themes using thematic analysis. Results and discussion: The findings of this study suggest that poorly coordinated service provision impacts upon enabling patients with cancer, who wish to die at home to achieve this goal. Poor discharge planning from the hospital, including a lack of communication with the community nursing team, coupled with delays in commencing additional care services and the delivery of equipment are all identified as influencing factors. This paper discusses these findings and recommendations for improving the services offered to terminally ill cancer patients and their families will be given.

AB - Background: Providing service users with a say in their care is integral to UK government health policies. For patients dying of cancer there is an emphasis on giving choice regarding their preferred location for care, which includes the option of dying at home. Initiatives such as the End of Life Care Programme that promote patients choices including their preferred place of death the have been established However despite these policies the situation persists where patients are being admitted to hospital in the terminal phase of their illness when they have expressed a desire to die at home. Aim: The study aimed to investigate the views of community nurses involved in end of life care for people with cancer in an attempt to explore the factors that influence where they are cared for and ultimately die. Methodology: A qualitative study, using audio taperecorded focus group interviews was employed for the study. A purposive sample of 19 district nurses and community specialist palliative care nurses from across two primary care trusts in the North West of England participated in two focus groups. Data were analysed for emerging themes using thematic analysis. Results and discussion: The findings of this study suggest that poorly coordinated service provision impacts upon enabling patients with cancer, who wish to die at home to achieve this goal. Poor discharge planning from the hospital, including a lack of communication with the community nursing team, coupled with delays in commencing additional care services and the delivery of equipment are all identified as influencing factors. This paper discusses these findings and recommendations for improving the services offered to terminally ill cancer patients and their families will be given.

M3 - Poster

ER -

O'Brien M, Jack B. The impact of poor coordination of community service provision on end of life care for patients with cancer. 2009. Poster session presented at 11th Congress for the European Association for Palliative Care, Vienna, Austria.