The Impact of Immersive Outdoor Activities in Local Woodlands on Young Carers Emotional Literacy and Well-Being

Jane Acton, Bernie Carter

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)
    80 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Children’s well-being is linked to a complex web of factors including the child’s personality, inherent protective mechanisms, family relationships, social capital and economic status. Young carers are particularly at risk from poor mental health outcomes and low well-being. In this study the impact of immersive activities in nature on the well-being of eight young carers (three girls and five boys; aged 9-13 years) was explored. The immersive woodland activities included practical skills such as fire making, cooking and using tools as well as team building and activities to hep build trust. A mixed method, pre-test/post-test approach was undertaken using Emotional Literacy Checklists and interviews, poems and discussion. There were measurable improvements - specifically in motivation and self-awareness - in the young carers’ emotional literacy as reported by the parents and teachers. The well-being indicators that were referenced most frequently by parents and teachers related to the children’s social relationships and their development as individuals. The children reported changed related to social, physical and 'natural connection' well-being.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-3
    JournalComprehensive Child and Adolescent Nursing
    Early online date6 Feb 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Feb 2016

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