The effect of acute taurine ingestion on 3-km running performance in trained middle-distance runners

T G Balshaw, T M Bampouras, T J Barry, S A Sparks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited research examining the effect of taurine (TA) ingestion on human exercise performance exists. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute ingestion of 1,000 mg of TA on maximal 3-km time trial (3KTT) performance in trained middle-distance runners (MDR). Eight male MDR (mean ± SD: age 19.9 ± 1.2 years, body mass 69.4 ± 6.6 kg, height 180.5 ± 7.5 cm, 800 m personal best time 121.0 ± 5.3 s) completed TA and placebo (PL) trials 1 week apart in a double-blind, randomised, crossover designed study. Participants consumed TA or PL in capsule form on arrival at the laboratory followed by a 2-h ingestion period. At the end of the ingestion period, participants commenced a maximal simulated 3KTT on a treadmill. Capillary blood lactate was measured pre- and post-3KTT. Expired gas, heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and split times were measured at 500-m intervals during the 3KTT. Ingestion of TA significantly improved 3KTT performance (TA 646.6 ± 52.8 s and PL 658.5 ± 58.2 s) (p = 0.013) equating to a 1.7 % improvement (range 0.34–4.24 %). Relative oxygen uptake, HR,RPE and blood lactate did not differ between conditions (p = 0.803, 0.364, 0.760 and 0.302, respectively). Magnitude-based inference results assessing the likeliness of a beneficial influence of TA were 99.3 %. However, the mechanism responsible for this improved performance is unclear. TA’s potential influence on exercise metabolism may involve interaction with the muscle membrane, the coordination or the force production capability of involved muscles. Further research employing more invasive techniques may elucidate TA’s role in improving maximal endurance performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)555-561
JournalAmino Acids
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2013

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Taurine
Running
Eating
Placebos
Muscle
Lactic Acid
Blood
Heart Rate
Muscles
Exercise equipment
Research
Metabolism
Cross-Over Studies
Capsules
Durability
Gases
Oxygen
Membranes

Keywords

  • Oxygen uptake � Ergogenic aids � Time trial � Endurance running

Cite this

Balshaw, T G ; Bampouras, T M ; Barry, T J ; Sparks, S A. / The effect of acute taurine ingestion on 3-km running performance in trained middle-distance runners. In: Amino Acids. 2013 ; Vol. 44, No. 2. pp. 555-561.
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The effect of acute taurine ingestion on 3-km running performance in trained middle-distance runners. / Balshaw, T G; Bampouras, T M; Barry, T J; Sparks, S A.

In: Amino Acids, Vol. 44, No. 2, 01.02.2013, p. 555-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Bampouras, T M

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AB - Limited research examining the effect of taurine (TA) ingestion on human exercise performance exists. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of acute ingestion of 1,000 mg of TA on maximal 3-km time trial (3KTT) performance in trained middle-distance runners (MDR). Eight male MDR (mean ± SD: age 19.9 ± 1.2 years, body mass 69.4 ± 6.6 kg, height 180.5 ± 7.5 cm, 800 m personal best time 121.0 ± 5.3 s) completed TA and placebo (PL) trials 1 week apart in a double-blind, randomised, crossover designed study. Participants consumed TA or PL in capsule form on arrival at the laboratory followed by a 2-h ingestion period. At the end of the ingestion period, participants commenced a maximal simulated 3KTT on a treadmill. Capillary blood lactate was measured pre- and post-3KTT. Expired gas, heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and split times were measured at 500-m intervals during the 3KTT. Ingestion of TA significantly improved 3KTT performance (TA 646.6 ± 52.8 s and PL 658.5 ± 58.2 s) (p = 0.013) equating to a 1.7 % improvement (range 0.34–4.24 %). Relative oxygen uptake, HR,RPE and blood lactate did not differ between conditions (p = 0.803, 0.364, 0.760 and 0.302, respectively). Magnitude-based inference results assessing the likeliness of a beneficial influence of TA were 99.3 %. However, the mechanism responsible for this improved performance is unclear. TA’s potential influence on exercise metabolism may involve interaction with the muscle membrane, the coordination or the force production capability of involved muscles. Further research employing more invasive techniques may elucidate TA’s role in improving maximal endurance performance.

KW - Oxygen uptake � Ergogenic aids � Time trial � Endurance running

U2 - 10.1007/s00726-012-1372-1

DO - 10.1007/s00726-012-1372-1

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SP - 555

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JO - Amino Acids

JF - Amino Acids

SN - 0939-4451

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