The Decoy Effect Within Alcohol Purchasing Decisions

Rebecca Monk, Adam Qureshi, Thomas Leatherbarrow, Annalise Highes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
3 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: The decoy effect is the phenomenon where the introduction of a third choice to a decision dyad changes the distribution of preferences between options. Objectives: Examine whether this effect exists in alcohol purchasing decisions and whether testing context impacts this. Method: Fiftytwo participants tested in either a bar or library context and were asked to choose one of a series of beer and water deals presented for timed intervals. In some cases, two options were presented (with similar attractiveness) and in other cases a third, less preferable, decoy option was added. Results: A basic decoy effect in both alcohol and water purchasing decisions. Specifically, there were reductions in the selection of both the original options when the decoy was added into choice dyads. A significant interaction demonstrated in the bar context there was a significant difference such that there was a slight increase in participants selecting the most cost effective option when the decoy was added, and a simultaneous decrease in those choosing the moderately cost effective option. There were no such differences observed in the library condition. Conclusion: The same product may be perceived differently across contexts and, as such, consumers in a pub environment may be particularly vulnerable to the decoy effect.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1353-1362
JournalSubstance Use and Misuse
Volume51
Issue number10
Early online date31 May 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 May 2016

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Libraries
alcohol
Alcohols
Costs and Cost Analysis
Water
dyad
water
costs
social attraction
interaction

Cite this

Monk, Rebecca ; Qureshi, Adam ; Leatherbarrow, Thomas ; Highes, Annalise. / The Decoy Effect Within Alcohol Purchasing Decisions. In: Substance Use and Misuse. 2016 ; Vol. 51, No. 10. pp. 1353-1362.
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The Decoy Effect Within Alcohol Purchasing Decisions. / Monk, Rebecca; Qureshi, Adam; Leatherbarrow, Thomas; Highes, Annalise.

In: Substance Use and Misuse, Vol. 51, No. 10, 31.05.2016, p. 1353-1362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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