Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'

L. Dunne, G. Goddard, C. Woolhouse

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper presents some issues that have emerged from an ongoing three year research project that explores the personal and professional life experiences of teaching assistants working in the primary, secondary and special school sectors who have either graduated or have embarked upon a foundation degree in Supporting Teaching and Learning at Edge Hill University. One of the aims of our research was to find out if doing a foundation degree had, as the foundation degree website claims, kick-started careers (2007). Throughout our research to date we decided to use a range of research methods, including questionnaires, case studies and focus group discussion. This paper primarily focuses upon the dialogue generated within the focus groups
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventWidening Participation Conference - Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom
Duration: 20 May 200821 May 2008

Conference

ConferenceWidening Participation Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityOrmskirk
Period20/05/0821/05/08

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lifelong learning
assistant
career
Teaching
costs
group discussion
research method
website
dialogue
questionnaire
school
learning
experience
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Cite this

Dunne, L., Goddard, G., & Woolhouse, C. (2008). Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'. Paper presented at Widening Participation Conference, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
Dunne, L. ; Goddard, G. ; Woolhouse, C. / Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'. Paper presented at Widening Participation Conference, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.
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Dunne, L, Goddard, G & Woolhouse, C 2008, 'Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'' Paper presented at Widening Participation Conference, Ormskirk, United Kingdom, 20/05/08 - 21/05/08, .

Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'. / Dunne, L.; Goddard, G.; Woolhouse, C.

2008. Paper presented at Widening Participation Conference, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'

AU - Dunne, L.

AU - Goddard, G.

AU - Woolhouse, C.

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - This paper presents some issues that have emerged from an ongoing three year research project that explores the personal and professional life experiences of teaching assistants working in the primary, secondary and special school sectors who have either graduated or have embarked upon a foundation degree in Supporting Teaching and Learning at Edge Hill University. One of the aims of our research was to find out if doing a foundation degree had, as the foundation degree website claims, kick-started careers (2007). Throughout our research to date we decided to use a range of research methods, including questionnaires, case studies and focus group discussion. This paper primarily focuses upon the dialogue generated within the focus groups

AB - This paper presents some issues that have emerged from an ongoing three year research project that explores the personal and professional life experiences of teaching assistants working in the primary, secondary and special school sectors who have either graduated or have embarked upon a foundation degree in Supporting Teaching and Learning at Edge Hill University. One of the aims of our research was to find out if doing a foundation degree had, as the foundation degree website claims, kick-started careers (2007). Throughout our research to date we decided to use a range of research methods, including questionnaires, case studies and focus group discussion. This paper primarily focuses upon the dialogue generated within the focus groups

M3 - Paper

ER -

Dunne L, Goddard G, Woolhouse C. Teaching Assistants Career trajectories and Foundation degrees: the affective costs of work-based lifelong learning'. 2008. Paper presented at Widening Participation Conference, Ormskirk, United Kingdom.