'Tales and adventures': G. A. Henty's Union Jack and the competitive world of publishing for boys in the 1880s

Minna Vuohelainen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In the competitive publishing environment of the late nineteenth century, writers and magazines had to distinguish themselves carefully from potential rivals. This article examines how G. A. Henty's quality boys' weekly, Union Jack (1880–83), attempted to secure a niche in the juvenile publishing market by deliberately distinguishing itself from other papers as a literary, imperialist and 'healthy' publication. The article explores the design and marketing techniques of the magazine, its status as a fiction paper, the high calibre of its contributors, and its aggressive rhetoric in targeting an exclusively masculine audience. It argues that while Union Jack was marketed as a niche publication, it eventually failed to distinguish itself sufficiently to survive in an extremely competitive environment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)183-196
JournalJournal of Popular Narrative Media
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2008

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