Supporting family carers providing end-of-life home care: a qualitative study on the impact of a hospice at home service

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)
6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aims and objectives: To explore bereaved family carers’ perceptions and experiences of a hospice at home service. Background: The increasing demand for the development of home-based end-of-life services is not confined to the westernworld; such services are also emerging in resource-poor countries where palliative care services are developing with limited inpatient facilities. Despite this growing trend, studies show a variety of interrelated factors, with an emphasis on the availability of informal carers and their ability to cope, which can influence whether terminally ill patients actually remain at home. A hospice at home service was developed to meet patients’ and families’ needs by providing individually tailored resources. Design. A qualitative study. Methods: Data were collected by semi-structured, digitally recorded interviews from 20 family carers who had experienced the service. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic approach adopted for analysis. Results: All participants reported a personal positive impact of the service. Family carers commented the service provided a valued presence, they felt in good hands and importantly it helped in supporting normal life. Conclusions: The impact of an individualised, targeted, hospice at home service using dedicated, palliative care trained, staff, is perceived positively by family carers and importantly, supportive of those with additional caring or employment commitments. Relevance to clinical practice: The emergence of hospice at home services has resulted in more options for patients and their families, when the increased amount of care a family member has to provide in these circumstances needs to be adequately supported, with the provision of a flexible service tailored to individual needs and delivered by appropriately trained staff.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-140
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume24
Issue number1-2
Early online date23 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 23 Dec 2014

Fingerprint

Hospices
Terminal Care
Home Care Services
Caregivers
Palliative Care
Interviews
Terminally Ill
Aptitude
Inpatients
Hand

Cite this

@article{8bd1e405dfe749e5b4f47b966ff19a9c,
title = "Supporting family carers providing end-of-life home care: a qualitative study on the impact of a hospice at home service",
abstract = "Aims and objectives: To explore bereaved family carers’ perceptions and experiences of a hospice at home service. Background: The increasing demand for the development of home-based end-of-life services is not confined to the westernworld; such services are also emerging in resource-poor countries where palliative care services are developing with limited inpatient facilities. Despite this growing trend, studies show a variety of interrelated factors, with an emphasis on the availability of informal carers and their ability to cope, which can influence whether terminally ill patients actually remain at home. A hospice at home service was developed to meet patients’ and families’ needs by providing individually tailored resources. Design. A qualitative study. Methods: Data were collected by semi-structured, digitally recorded interviews from 20 family carers who had experienced the service. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic approach adopted for analysis. Results: All participants reported a personal positive impact of the service. Family carers commented the service provided a valued presence, they felt in good hands and importantly it helped in supporting normal life. Conclusions: The impact of an individualised, targeted, hospice at home service using dedicated, palliative care trained, staff, is perceived positively by family carers and importantly, supportive of those with additional caring or employment commitments. Relevance to clinical practice: The emergence of hospice at home services has resulted in more options for patients and their families, when the increased amount of care a family member has to provide in these circumstances needs to be adequately supported, with the provision of a flexible service tailored to individual needs and delivered by appropriately trained staff.",
author = "Jack, {Barbara A} and O'Brien, {Mary R} and Joyce Scrutton and Baldry, {C R} and KE Groves",
year = "2014",
month = "12",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1111/jocn.12695",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "131--140",
journal = "Journal of Clinical Nursing",
issn = "0962-1067",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons",
number = "1-2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Supporting family carers providing end-of-life home care: a qualitative study on the impact of a hospice at home service

AU - Jack, Barbara A

AU - O'Brien, Mary R

AU - Scrutton, Joyce

AU - Baldry, C R

AU - Groves, KE

PY - 2014/12/23

Y1 - 2014/12/23

N2 - Aims and objectives: To explore bereaved family carers’ perceptions and experiences of a hospice at home service. Background: The increasing demand for the development of home-based end-of-life services is not confined to the westernworld; such services are also emerging in resource-poor countries where palliative care services are developing with limited inpatient facilities. Despite this growing trend, studies show a variety of interrelated factors, with an emphasis on the availability of informal carers and their ability to cope, which can influence whether terminally ill patients actually remain at home. A hospice at home service was developed to meet patients’ and families’ needs by providing individually tailored resources. Design. A qualitative study. Methods: Data were collected by semi-structured, digitally recorded interviews from 20 family carers who had experienced the service. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic approach adopted for analysis. Results: All participants reported a personal positive impact of the service. Family carers commented the service provided a valued presence, they felt in good hands and importantly it helped in supporting normal life. Conclusions: The impact of an individualised, targeted, hospice at home service using dedicated, palliative care trained, staff, is perceived positively by family carers and importantly, supportive of those with additional caring or employment commitments. Relevance to clinical practice: The emergence of hospice at home services has resulted in more options for patients and their families, when the increased amount of care a family member has to provide in these circumstances needs to be adequately supported, with the provision of a flexible service tailored to individual needs and delivered by appropriately trained staff.

AB - Aims and objectives: To explore bereaved family carers’ perceptions and experiences of a hospice at home service. Background: The increasing demand for the development of home-based end-of-life services is not confined to the westernworld; such services are also emerging in resource-poor countries where palliative care services are developing with limited inpatient facilities. Despite this growing trend, studies show a variety of interrelated factors, with an emphasis on the availability of informal carers and their ability to cope, which can influence whether terminally ill patients actually remain at home. A hospice at home service was developed to meet patients’ and families’ needs by providing individually tailored resources. Design. A qualitative study. Methods: Data were collected by semi-structured, digitally recorded interviews from 20 family carers who had experienced the service. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and a thematic approach adopted for analysis. Results: All participants reported a personal positive impact of the service. Family carers commented the service provided a valued presence, they felt in good hands and importantly it helped in supporting normal life. Conclusions: The impact of an individualised, targeted, hospice at home service using dedicated, palliative care trained, staff, is perceived positively by family carers and importantly, supportive of those with additional caring or employment commitments. Relevance to clinical practice: The emergence of hospice at home services has resulted in more options for patients and their families, when the increased amount of care a family member has to provide in these circumstances needs to be adequately supported, with the provision of a flexible service tailored to individual needs and delivered by appropriately trained staff.

U2 - 10.1111/jocn.12695

DO - 10.1111/jocn.12695

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 131

EP - 140

JO - Journal of Clinical Nursing

JF - Journal of Clinical Nursing

SN - 0962-1067

IS - 1-2

ER -