Students’ perceptions of autonomy-supportive versus controlling teaching and basic need satisfaction versus frustration in relation to life skills development in PE

LORCAN CRONIN, DAVID MARCHANT, Justine Allen, Claire Mulvenna, David Cullen, GARETH WILLIAMS, PAUL ELLISON

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between perceived teacher autonomy support versus control and students’ life skills development in PE, and whether students’ basic need satisfaction and frustration mediated these relationships. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. METHOD English and Irish students (N = 407, Mage = 13.71, SD = 1.23) completed measures assessing perceived autonomy-supportive and controlling teaching, basic need satisfaction and frustration (autonomy, competence, and relatedness), and life skills development in PE (teamwork, goal setting, social skills, problem solving and decision making, emotional skills, leadership, time management, and interpersonal communication). RESULTS On the bright side of Self-Determination Theory (SDT), correlations revealed that perceived teacher autonomy support was positively associated with students’ basic need satisfaction and life skills development in PE. On the dark side of SDT, perceived controlling teaching was positively related to students’ basic need frustration, but not significantly related to their life skills development. Mediational analyses revealed that autonomy and relatedness satisfaction mediated the relationships between perceived teacher autonomy support and students’ development of all eight life skills. Competence satisfaction mediated the relationships between perceived teacher autonomy support and students’ development of teamwork, goal setting, and leadership skills. CONCLUSIONS Our findings indicate that satisfaction of the needs for autonomy, competence, and relatedness are important mechanisms that in part explain the relationships between perceived teacher autonomy support and life skills development in PE. Therefore, teachers may look to promote students’ perceptions of an autonomy-supportive climate that satisfies their three basic needs and helps to develop their life skills.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)79-89
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology of Sport & Exercise
Volume44
Early online date11 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2019

Keywords

  • positive youth development
  • psychosocial skills
  • PE teaching

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