Students’ experience of isolation room punishment in UK mainstream education. ‘I can’t put into words what you felt like, almost a dog in a cage’

Julie Sealy, Elizabeth J. Abrams, Tom Cockburn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Over the past five years, school exclusions have increased in the UK and have become an accepted method of behaviour management. One way of excluding children from mainstream education is through the use of isolation room punishment where children are removed from their classroom and placed in a designated area away from their peers. Isolation units exist in most British schools with each individual school allowed to determine how this system is implemented and managed with little statutory and legislative regulation and oversight. Evidence suggests that best practice standards are lacking, and children placed in isolation room punishment are being denied access to the curriculum and are deprived of physical activities, stimulation and social interaction. Eight young people share their experience of isolation room punishment and their narratives capture their frustration and anger but also their pain and despondency in a system they see as unjust.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalInternational Journal of Inclusive Education
Early online date22 Feb 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • punishment
  • Education
  • isolation room
  • school exclusion
  • mainstream education
  • Punishment

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