Stopping while going! Response inhibition does not suffer dual-task interference.

Motonori Yamaguchi, Gordon D. Logan, Patrick G. Bissett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although dual-task interference is ubiquitous in a variety of task domains, stop-signal studies suggest that response inhibition is not subject to such interference. Nevertheless, no study has directly examined stop-signal performance in a dual-task setting. In two experiments, stop-signal performance was examined in a psychological refractory period task, in which subjects inhibited one response while still executing the other. The results showed little evidence for the refractory effect in stop-signal reaction time, and stop-signal reaction time was similar in dual-task and single-task conditions, despite the fact that overt reaction times were significantly affected by dual-task interference. Therefore, the present study supports the claim that response inhibition does not suffer dual-task interference.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)123-134
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Reaction Time
Psychological Refractory Periods
Inhibition (Psychology)
Interference
Dual Task

Cite this

Yamaguchi, Motonori ; Logan, Gordon D. ; Bissett, Patrick G. / Stopping while going! Response inhibition does not suffer dual-task interference. In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance. 2012 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 123-134.
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Stopping while going! Response inhibition does not suffer dual-task interference. / Yamaguchi, Motonori; Logan, Gordon D.; Bissett, Patrick G.

In: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, Vol. 38, No. 1, 2012, p. 123-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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