Risk stratification for poor health-related quality of life following head and neck cancer through the aid of a one-page item prompt list

Joshua Twigg, Anastasios Kanatas, Gerald M. Humphris, Derek Lowe, SIMON ROGERS

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

The aim of this work was to evaluate the usability of a single-page, patient-completed, condition-specific prompt list, the Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI-HN), to risk-stratify for poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Data were collected between 2008 and 2017. The main dataset comprised 310 patients first completing the PCI-HN and University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire(UW-QOLv4) between 2012 and 2017. Another 201 patients first completing the PCI-HN between 2008 and 2011 provided a second dataset for independent validation. Subsequent completions of the PCI-HN in both groups and the distress thermometer (DT) were also used as further validation datasets. Associations between PCI-HN items selected by patients and a range of UW-QOLv4 outcomes were explored using conventional logistic regression and Chi-squared automated interaction detection (CHAID) analyses. One quarter of patients reported less than good HRQOL, range 26–29% across the four datasets. Several individual items from within the PCI-HN were predictive of adverse outcomes. The total number of items selected was also predictive. The single-sheet prompt list enables clinicians to identify patients at high risk of poor HRQOL. This simple approach has the potential to be integrated into routine clinical practice.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Early online date20 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • quality of life
  • screening
  • patient reported outcome measures
  • survival
  • cancer of head and neck

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