Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course

C. Mosley, Ben Shaw

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Background: Aims 1) to investigate whether airway management and non invasive ventilatory skills are retained after the NLS course, 2) to compare the relationship between the resuscitation provider's confidence in and their competence at, performing these skills. Summary of Work: Canditates undertaking the NLS course in a single centre were recruited over a two year period. An airway management scenario re-test took place 3-5 months after the course. Immediately prior to the test they completed a self-assessment questionnaire and if unsuccessful in the test they were offered a mini 'booster' session and re-tested immediately. Peer review forms asking about competence distributed to their colleagues. If successful the candidates were tested at 12-14 months. Summary of results: 166 candidates were recruited into the study. First re-tes (n=66). Passed: 1st attempt 25 (40%), 2nd attempt 34 (52%), Failed 7 (11%). Second re-test (n=41) . Passed: 1st attempt 16 (40%), 2nd attempt 23 (56%), Failed 2 (5%). Main reasons for re-test were, failure to assess HR after inflation breaths, failure to dry or remove the towel, incorrect insertion of airway and not assessing chest movement. Conclusions: There is poor retention of knowledge and skills over a short time after NLS course. Re-testing at 3-5months doesn't assist with knowledge and skills retention. Despite a 'booster' on the first re-test there were different reasons for re-testing at the subsequent test. Take-home messages: 1) A booster session may remind candidates of a 'scenario-format'. 2) Health care professionals find 'scenario' testing difficult.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2010
EventAssociation for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference - Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 Sep 20108 Sep 2010

Conference

ConferenceAssociation for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period4/09/108/09/10

Fingerprint

Airway Management
Newborn Infant
Mental Competency
Peer Review
Economic Inflation
Resuscitation
Thorax
Delivery of Health Care
Self-Assessment
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Mosley, C., & Shaw, B. (2010). Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course. Paper presented at Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
Mosley, C. ; Shaw, Ben. / Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course. Paper presented at Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
@conference{5125aaa8f7a247489acc985b7f2a9435,
title = "Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course",
abstract = "Background: Aims 1) to investigate whether airway management and non invasive ventilatory skills are retained after the NLS course, 2) to compare the relationship between the resuscitation provider's confidence in and their competence at, performing these skills. Summary of Work: Canditates undertaking the NLS course in a single centre were recruited over a two year period. An airway management scenario re-test took place 3-5 months after the course. Immediately prior to the test they completed a self-assessment questionnaire and if unsuccessful in the test they were offered a mini 'booster' session and re-tested immediately. Peer review forms asking about competence distributed to their colleagues. If successful the candidates were tested at 12-14 months. Summary of results: 166 candidates were recruited into the study. First re-tes (n=66). Passed: 1st attempt 25 (40{\%}), 2nd attempt 34 (52{\%}), Failed 7 (11{\%}). Second re-test (n=41) . Passed: 1st attempt 16 (40{\%}), 2nd attempt 23 (56{\%}), Failed 2 (5{\%}). Main reasons for re-test were, failure to assess HR after inflation breaths, failure to dry or remove the towel, incorrect insertion of airway and not assessing chest movement. Conclusions: There is poor retention of knowledge and skills over a short time after NLS course. Re-testing at 3-5months doesn't assist with knowledge and skills retention. Despite a 'booster' on the first re-test there were different reasons for re-testing at the subsequent test. Take-home messages: 1) A booster session may remind candidates of a 'scenario-format'. 2) Health care professionals find 'scenario' testing difficult.",
author = "C. Mosley and Ben Shaw",
year = "2010",
language = "English",
note = "Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference ; Conference date: 04-09-2010 Through 08-09-2010",

}

Mosley, C & Shaw, B 2010, 'Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course' Paper presented at Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 4/09/10 - 8/09/10, .

Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course. / Mosley, C.; Shaw, Ben.

2010. Paper presented at Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

TY - CONF

T1 - Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course

AU - Mosley, C.

AU - Shaw, Ben

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Background: Aims 1) to investigate whether airway management and non invasive ventilatory skills are retained after the NLS course, 2) to compare the relationship between the resuscitation provider's confidence in and their competence at, performing these skills. Summary of Work: Canditates undertaking the NLS course in a single centre were recruited over a two year period. An airway management scenario re-test took place 3-5 months after the course. Immediately prior to the test they completed a self-assessment questionnaire and if unsuccessful in the test they were offered a mini 'booster' session and re-tested immediately. Peer review forms asking about competence distributed to their colleagues. If successful the candidates were tested at 12-14 months. Summary of results: 166 candidates were recruited into the study. First re-tes (n=66). Passed: 1st attempt 25 (40%), 2nd attempt 34 (52%), Failed 7 (11%). Second re-test (n=41) . Passed: 1st attempt 16 (40%), 2nd attempt 23 (56%), Failed 2 (5%). Main reasons for re-test were, failure to assess HR after inflation breaths, failure to dry or remove the towel, incorrect insertion of airway and not assessing chest movement. Conclusions: There is poor retention of knowledge and skills over a short time after NLS course. Re-testing at 3-5months doesn't assist with knowledge and skills retention. Despite a 'booster' on the first re-test there were different reasons for re-testing at the subsequent test. Take-home messages: 1) A booster session may remind candidates of a 'scenario-format'. 2) Health care professionals find 'scenario' testing difficult.

AB - Background: Aims 1) to investigate whether airway management and non invasive ventilatory skills are retained after the NLS course, 2) to compare the relationship between the resuscitation provider's confidence in and their competence at, performing these skills. Summary of Work: Canditates undertaking the NLS course in a single centre were recruited over a two year period. An airway management scenario re-test took place 3-5 months after the course. Immediately prior to the test they completed a self-assessment questionnaire and if unsuccessful in the test they were offered a mini 'booster' session and re-tested immediately. Peer review forms asking about competence distributed to their colleagues. If successful the candidates were tested at 12-14 months. Summary of results: 166 candidates were recruited into the study. First re-tes (n=66). Passed: 1st attempt 25 (40%), 2nd attempt 34 (52%), Failed 7 (11%). Second re-test (n=41) . Passed: 1st attempt 16 (40%), 2nd attempt 23 (56%), Failed 2 (5%). Main reasons for re-test were, failure to assess HR after inflation breaths, failure to dry or remove the towel, incorrect insertion of airway and not assessing chest movement. Conclusions: There is poor retention of knowledge and skills over a short time after NLS course. Re-testing at 3-5months doesn't assist with knowledge and skills retention. Despite a 'booster' on the first re-test there were different reasons for re-testing at the subsequent test. Take-home messages: 1) A booster session may remind candidates of a 'scenario-format'. 2) Health care professionals find 'scenario' testing difficult.

M3 - Paper

ER -

Mosley C, Shaw B. Retention of knowledge and skills over time following the Newborn Life Support (NLS) course. 2010. Paper presented at Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE) Conference, Glasgow, United Kingdom.