Repeated High-Intensity Technique Training and Repeated Sprint Training Elicit Similar Adjustment in Physiological Responses But Divergent Perceptual Responses and Combat-Related Performances in Adolescent Taekwondo Matches

Ibrahim Ouergui, Slaheddine Delleli, Hamdi Messaoudi, CRAIG BRIDGE, Hamdi Chtourou, Emerson Franchini, Luca Paolo Ardigò

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Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the effects of 4 weeks of repeated sprint training (RST) versus repeated high-intensity technique training (RTT) on the physiological responses (ie, blood lactate), mean and peak heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, technical–tactical performance, and time–motion variables during simulated taekwondo combats. Methods: Twenty-four taekwondo athletes (18 male and 6 female; age: 16 [1] y) were randomly and equally assigned to RST (10 × 35-m running sprints interspersed by 10-s rest) or RTT (10 × 6-s bandal-tchagui kicking executions interspersed by 10-s rest) groups in addition to their regular training. Both groups performed simulated combats before and after training. Results: Delta lactate and peak heart rate were attenuated following training (P < .001 and P = .03, respectively), with no differences identified between RTT and RST conditions. Rating of perceived exertion decreased after training only in the RTT (P = .002). Time fighting and preparatory activities increased following training (P < .001), with higher values observed following RTT than RST (P < .001). Nonpreparatory time decreased after training (P < .001), with more pronounced reductions observed following RTT when compared to RST (P < .001). The number of single attacks decreased only following RST (P < .001), whereas combined attacks increased only after RTT training (P < .001). Conclusions: Similar adjustments in the physiological responses to combat were observed following 4 weeks of either RST or RTT, but RTT elicited more favorable perceptual responses and combat-related performance. This highlights the importance of specificity of training and its effective transfer to combat.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Early online date7 Jun 2023
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 7 Jun 2023

Keywords

  • Combat Sports
  • Specificity
  • Performance
  • HITT

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