Precompetitive state anxiety, objective and subjective performance, and causal attributions in competitive swimmers

Remco Polman*, Naomi Rowcliffe, Erika Borkoles, Andrew Levy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the nature of the relationship between precompetitive state anxiety (CSAI-2C), subjective (race position) and objective (satisfaction) performance outcomes, and self-rated causal attributions (CDS-IIC) for performance in competitive child swimmers. Race position, subjective satisfaction, self-confidence, and, to a lesser extent, cognitive state anxiety (but not somatic state anxiety) were associated with the attributions provided by the children for their swimming performance. The study partially supported the self-serving bias hypothesis; winners used the ego-enhancing attributional strategy, but the losers did not use an ego-protecting attributional style. Age but not gender appeared to influence the attributions provided in achievement situations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-50
Number of pages12
JournalPediatric Exercise Science
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Keywords

  • CDS-IIC
  • Children
  • CSAI-2C
  • Gender

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