Place Bonding in Children’s Hospice Care: a qualitative study.

H. Dunbar, Bernie Carter, J. Brown

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Limited knowledge exists of parents’ perceptions and experiences of children’s hospices and how these contribute to the varied access and uptake of services. Aim: This study aimed to explore parents’ perspectives and experiences of a hospice, to understand the barriers and/or facilitators to accessing a hospice, and what characteristics parents wanted from hospice provision. Methods: A two phase qualitative study underpinned by a constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed. Phase 1 used focus groups to collect data from parents of children already accessing the hospice (n=24). Phase 2 used in-depth semi-structured interviews with parents of children who did not use the hospice (n=7) and parents who had previous experience of using a hospice (n=7). Results: A grounded theory of place bonding was developed which illustrates the cognitive journey taken by parents of children with life-limiting conditions considering/receiving hospice care for their child. Conclusions: Finding a place where they belonged and felt at ‘home’ made the decision to accept help in caring for their child with a life-limiting condition more acceptable. The theory of place bonding offers children’s hospices a new perspective from which to view how parents access, accept and build relationships at the hospice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
JournalBritish Medical Journal Supportive & Palliative Care
Early online date14 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Aug 2018

Fingerprint

Hospice Care
Hospices
Parents
Object Attachment
Focus Groups
Interviews

Keywords

  • children’s palliative care
  • hospice
  • place bonding
  • parents’ experiences

Cite this

@article{4c6f0b1477c6460daaf55d2044da43ce,
title = "Place Bonding in Children’s Hospice Care: a qualitative study.",
abstract = "Background: Limited knowledge exists of parents’ perceptions and experiences of children’s hospices and how these contribute to the varied access and uptake of services. Aim: This study aimed to explore parents’ perspectives and experiences of a hospice, to understand the barriers and/or facilitators to accessing a hospice, and what characteristics parents wanted from hospice provision. Methods: A two phase qualitative study underpinned by a constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed. Phase 1 used focus groups to collect data from parents of children already accessing the hospice (n=24). Phase 2 used in-depth semi-structured interviews with parents of children who did not use the hospice (n=7) and parents who had previous experience of using a hospice (n=7). Results: A grounded theory of place bonding was developed which illustrates the cognitive journey taken by parents of children with life-limiting conditions considering/receiving hospice care for their child. Conclusions: Finding a place where they belonged and felt at ‘home’ made the decision to accept help in caring for their child with a life-limiting condition more acceptable. The theory of place bonding offers children’s hospices a new perspective from which to view how parents access, accept and build relationships at the hospice.",
keywords = "children’s palliative care, hospice, place bonding, parents’ experiences",
author = "H. Dunbar and Bernie Carter and J. Brown",
note = "Funded by hospice but none attached to EHU",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1136/bmjspcare-2018-001543",
language = "English",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care",
issn = "2045-435X",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group Limited",

}

Place Bonding in Children’s Hospice Care: a qualitative study. / Dunbar, H.; Carter, Bernie; Brown, J.

In: British Medical Journal Supportive & Palliative Care, 14.08.2018, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Place Bonding in Children’s Hospice Care: a qualitative study.

AU - Dunbar, H.

AU - Carter, Bernie

AU - Brown, J.

N1 - Funded by hospice but none attached to EHU

PY - 2018/8/14

Y1 - 2018/8/14

N2 - Background: Limited knowledge exists of parents’ perceptions and experiences of children’s hospices and how these contribute to the varied access and uptake of services. Aim: This study aimed to explore parents’ perspectives and experiences of a hospice, to understand the barriers and/or facilitators to accessing a hospice, and what characteristics parents wanted from hospice provision. Methods: A two phase qualitative study underpinned by a constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed. Phase 1 used focus groups to collect data from parents of children already accessing the hospice (n=24). Phase 2 used in-depth semi-structured interviews with parents of children who did not use the hospice (n=7) and parents who had previous experience of using a hospice (n=7). Results: A grounded theory of place bonding was developed which illustrates the cognitive journey taken by parents of children with life-limiting conditions considering/receiving hospice care for their child. Conclusions: Finding a place where they belonged and felt at ‘home’ made the decision to accept help in caring for their child with a life-limiting condition more acceptable. The theory of place bonding offers children’s hospices a new perspective from which to view how parents access, accept and build relationships at the hospice.

AB - Background: Limited knowledge exists of parents’ perceptions and experiences of children’s hospices and how these contribute to the varied access and uptake of services. Aim: This study aimed to explore parents’ perspectives and experiences of a hospice, to understand the barriers and/or facilitators to accessing a hospice, and what characteristics parents wanted from hospice provision. Methods: A two phase qualitative study underpinned by a constructivist grounded theory methodology was employed. Phase 1 used focus groups to collect data from parents of children already accessing the hospice (n=24). Phase 2 used in-depth semi-structured interviews with parents of children who did not use the hospice (n=7) and parents who had previous experience of using a hospice (n=7). Results: A grounded theory of place bonding was developed which illustrates the cognitive journey taken by parents of children with life-limiting conditions considering/receiving hospice care for their child. Conclusions: Finding a place where they belonged and felt at ‘home’ made the decision to accept help in caring for their child with a life-limiting condition more acceptable. The theory of place bonding offers children’s hospices a new perspective from which to view how parents access, accept and build relationships at the hospice.

KW - children’s palliative care

KW - hospice

KW - place bonding

KW - parents’ experiences

U2 - 10.1136/bmjspcare-2018-001543

DO - 10.1136/bmjspcare-2018-001543

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care

JF - BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care

SN - 2045-435X

ER -