Patients' views on their consultation experience in community pharmacies and the potential prescribing role for pharmacists in Nigeria

A. Auta, N.C. Fredrick, S. David, S.B. Banwat, M.A. Adeniyi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: The study aims to explore the views of patients of community pharmacists on their consultation experiences, and the possible extension of prescribing rights to pharmacists in Nigeria. Method: A questionnaire survey was conducted in April to May 2012 in Jos, Nigeria, among 432 patients of community pharmacists recruited through a convenience sampling strategy. Data collected were entered into SPSS version 16 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) to generate descriptive statistics. Key findings: Of the 432 questionnaires administered, 374 were filled and returned, representing a response rate of 86.6%. The results revealed that 342 (91.4%) respondents were satisfied with their consultation visits, and patient education was a vital part of the pharmacists' consultations as 298 (79.7%) patients reported better understanding of their illness after their consultations. Three hundred and forty-six (92.5%) respondents supported an extended role in prescribing for pharmacists in Nigeria. However, 298 (79.7%) respondents were more comfortable with the pharmacist prescribing from a restricted formulary, and 269 (71.9%) of them would prefer to see their doctor if their conditions get worse. Conclusion: This study provides an understanding on the experiences of patients during community pharmacists' consultations and patients' views on extending prescribing rights to pharmacists in Nigeria.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-236
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Pharmaceutical Health Services Research
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014

Keywords

  • Community pharmacists
  • Patients' satisfaction
  • Pharmacists prescribing

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