OP11 Wearable technology and simulation to support learning. Is it the way forward? A pilot study in primary care with healthcare professionals across the north west: Wearable Technology

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Abstract

Aim: This study evaluated the use of wearable technology to support a series of simulated learning events in General Practice (GP) to explore the potential new ways to improve educational practice1. The use of ‘connected’ glasses with a camera allows the trainee and patient actor to be observed by the trainer from a distant site in real time. Recordings can be used for discussion and reflection. Objectives: To explore whether the use of ‘connected’ glasses is useful to all those involved in a simulated consultation, (the wearer of the device, the patient actor being managed and the person observing). To ascertain whether real–time supervision and support is made possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and whether they are perceived as being helpful for the learner and supervisor. To determine whether a two–way dialogue and video link is possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and to explore their associated benefits and limitations. Summary of work undertaken: Ethical approval was granted by Health Education England North West Research & Innovation Committee and the Faculty of Health & Social Care Research Ethics Committee, Edge Hill University. Simulated scenarios took place on 3 occasions at 2 GP Practices in the North West. A pair of Optinvent ORA-1 glasses were used on one occasion and a pair of ‘Google Glasses’ were used on the 2 other occasions. The simulated scenario saw the GP Trainee (wearing the ‘connected’ glasses) taking a clinical history from the simulated patient, the actor, and being observed by the senior trainer from a distance. 9 semi-structured interviews were undertaken after the simulated scenarios: 2 GP Trainers, 4 GP Trainees and one patient actor. Interview questions focused on participant perceptions on the use of ‘connected’ glasses and their potential to enhance the learning and supervisory experience. Interview data analysis identified 2 key themes: the limitations of the technology; the potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’2 The limitations of the technology The reliance on a reliable Wi-Fi connection proved to be a drawback as this led to undue delay while the ‘connected’ glasses were set up for the simulated scenarios. In a busy GP surgery these delays were viewed as a major disadvantage. The ‘connected’ glasses, despite significant advances in design, were still perceived to be a distraction for the wearer. The potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’ All interviewees saw the potential benefit of ‘connected’ glasses as an enhancement to the educational experience. This is highly dependent though on the reliability of the technology and internet connection and further developments on minimalizing the relative bulkiness of the glasses for the wearer. Impact on practice: All interviewees perceived the ‘connected’ glasses as having the potential to enhance educational practice. However, the physical structure of the glasses and reliance on a reliable internet connection was a distraction. With improvements as suggested above the use of wearable technology in the form of ‘connected eye wear’ warrants further exploration in the GP setting. References Department of Health A Framework for Technology Enhanced Learning. (2011). https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/215316/dh_131061.pdf. Bryman A. (2012). Social Research Methods. 4th edition. Oxford University Press. Oxford.
Original languageEnglish
Article number5:A7-A8.
JournalBMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning
Volume5
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

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@article{f1548bbfb465478b95b711d95951efe9,
title = "OP11 Wearable technology and simulation to support learning. Is it the way forward? A pilot study in primary care with healthcare professionals across the north west: Wearable Technology",
abstract = "Aim: This study evaluated the use of wearable technology to support a series of simulated learning events in General Practice (GP) to explore the potential new ways to improve educational practice1. The use of ‘connected’ glasses with a camera allows the trainee and patient actor to be observed by the trainer from a distant site in real time. Recordings can be used for discussion and reflection. Objectives: To explore whether the use of ‘connected’ glasses is useful to all those involved in a simulated consultation, (the wearer of the device, the patient actor being managed and the person observing). To ascertain whether real–time supervision and support is made possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and whether they are perceived as being helpful for the learner and supervisor. To determine whether a two–way dialogue and video link is possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and to explore their associated benefits and limitations. Summary of work undertaken: Ethical approval was granted by Health Education England North West Research & Innovation Committee and the Faculty of Health & Social Care Research Ethics Committee, Edge Hill University. Simulated scenarios took place on 3 occasions at 2 GP Practices in the North West. A pair of Optinvent ORA-1 glasses were used on one occasion and a pair of ‘Google Glasses’ were used on the 2 other occasions. The simulated scenario saw the GP Trainee (wearing the ‘connected’ glasses) taking a clinical history from the simulated patient, the actor, and being observed by the senior trainer from a distance. 9 semi-structured interviews were undertaken after the simulated scenarios: 2 GP Trainers, 4 GP Trainees and one patient actor. Interview questions focused on participant perceptions on the use of ‘connected’ glasses and their potential to enhance the learning and supervisory experience. Interview data analysis identified 2 key themes: the limitations of the technology; the potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’2 The limitations of the technology The reliance on a reliable Wi-Fi connection proved to be a drawback as this led to undue delay while the ‘connected’ glasses were set up for the simulated scenarios. In a busy GP surgery these delays were viewed as a major disadvantage. The ‘connected’ glasses, despite significant advances in design, were still perceived to be a distraction for the wearer. The potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’ All interviewees saw the potential benefit of ‘connected’ glasses as an enhancement to the educational experience. This is highly dependent though on the reliability of the technology and internet connection and further developments on minimalizing the relative bulkiness of the glasses for the wearer. Impact on practice: All interviewees perceived the ‘connected’ glasses as having the potential to enhance educational practice. However, the physical structure of the glasses and reliance on a reliable internet connection was a distraction. With improvements as suggested above the use of wearable technology in the form of ‘connected eye wear’ warrants further exploration in the GP setting. References Department of Health A Framework for Technology Enhanced Learning. (2011). https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/215316/dh_131061.pdf. Bryman A. (2012). Social Research Methods. 4th edition. Oxford University Press. Oxford.",
author = "JEREMY BROWN",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning",
issn = "2056-6697",
publisher = "BMJ",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - OP11 Wearable technology and simulation to support learning. Is it the way forward? A pilot study in primary care with healthcare professionals across the north west

T2 - Wearable Technology

AU - BROWN, JEREMY

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Aim: This study evaluated the use of wearable technology to support a series of simulated learning events in General Practice (GP) to explore the potential new ways to improve educational practice1. The use of ‘connected’ glasses with a camera allows the trainee and patient actor to be observed by the trainer from a distant site in real time. Recordings can be used for discussion and reflection. Objectives: To explore whether the use of ‘connected’ glasses is useful to all those involved in a simulated consultation, (the wearer of the device, the patient actor being managed and the person observing). To ascertain whether real–time supervision and support is made possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and whether they are perceived as being helpful for the learner and supervisor. To determine whether a two–way dialogue and video link is possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and to explore their associated benefits and limitations. Summary of work undertaken: Ethical approval was granted by Health Education England North West Research & Innovation Committee and the Faculty of Health & Social Care Research Ethics Committee, Edge Hill University. Simulated scenarios took place on 3 occasions at 2 GP Practices in the North West. A pair of Optinvent ORA-1 glasses were used on one occasion and a pair of ‘Google Glasses’ were used on the 2 other occasions. The simulated scenario saw the GP Trainee (wearing the ‘connected’ glasses) taking a clinical history from the simulated patient, the actor, and being observed by the senior trainer from a distance. 9 semi-structured interviews were undertaken after the simulated scenarios: 2 GP Trainers, 4 GP Trainees and one patient actor. Interview questions focused on participant perceptions on the use of ‘connected’ glasses and their potential to enhance the learning and supervisory experience. Interview data analysis identified 2 key themes: the limitations of the technology; the potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’2 The limitations of the technology The reliance on a reliable Wi-Fi connection proved to be a drawback as this led to undue delay while the ‘connected’ glasses were set up for the simulated scenarios. In a busy GP surgery these delays were viewed as a major disadvantage. The ‘connected’ glasses, despite significant advances in design, were still perceived to be a distraction for the wearer. The potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’ All interviewees saw the potential benefit of ‘connected’ glasses as an enhancement to the educational experience. This is highly dependent though on the reliability of the technology and internet connection and further developments on minimalizing the relative bulkiness of the glasses for the wearer. Impact on practice: All interviewees perceived the ‘connected’ glasses as having the potential to enhance educational practice. However, the physical structure of the glasses and reliance on a reliable internet connection was a distraction. With improvements as suggested above the use of wearable technology in the form of ‘connected eye wear’ warrants further exploration in the GP setting. References Department of Health A Framework for Technology Enhanced Learning. (2011). https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/215316/dh_131061.pdf. Bryman A. (2012). Social Research Methods. 4th edition. Oxford University Press. Oxford.

AB - Aim: This study evaluated the use of wearable technology to support a series of simulated learning events in General Practice (GP) to explore the potential new ways to improve educational practice1. The use of ‘connected’ glasses with a camera allows the trainee and patient actor to be observed by the trainer from a distant site in real time. Recordings can be used for discussion and reflection. Objectives: To explore whether the use of ‘connected’ glasses is useful to all those involved in a simulated consultation, (the wearer of the device, the patient actor being managed and the person observing). To ascertain whether real–time supervision and support is made possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and whether they are perceived as being helpful for the learner and supervisor. To determine whether a two–way dialogue and video link is possible using the ‘connected’ glasses and to explore their associated benefits and limitations. Summary of work undertaken: Ethical approval was granted by Health Education England North West Research & Innovation Committee and the Faculty of Health & Social Care Research Ethics Committee, Edge Hill University. Simulated scenarios took place on 3 occasions at 2 GP Practices in the North West. A pair of Optinvent ORA-1 glasses were used on one occasion and a pair of ‘Google Glasses’ were used on the 2 other occasions. The simulated scenario saw the GP Trainee (wearing the ‘connected’ glasses) taking a clinical history from the simulated patient, the actor, and being observed by the senior trainer from a distance. 9 semi-structured interviews were undertaken after the simulated scenarios: 2 GP Trainers, 4 GP Trainees and one patient actor. Interview questions focused on participant perceptions on the use of ‘connected’ glasses and their potential to enhance the learning and supervisory experience. Interview data analysis identified 2 key themes: the limitations of the technology; the potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’2 The limitations of the technology The reliance on a reliable Wi-Fi connection proved to be a drawback as this led to undue delay while the ‘connected’ glasses were set up for the simulated scenarios. In a busy GP surgery these delays were viewed as a major disadvantage. The ‘connected’ glasses, despite significant advances in design, were still perceived to be a distraction for the wearer. The potential enhancement of the teaching and learning experience by using ‘connected glasses’ All interviewees saw the potential benefit of ‘connected’ glasses as an enhancement to the educational experience. This is highly dependent though on the reliability of the technology and internet connection and further developments on minimalizing the relative bulkiness of the glasses for the wearer. Impact on practice: All interviewees perceived the ‘connected’ glasses as having the potential to enhance educational practice. However, the physical structure of the glasses and reliance on a reliable internet connection was a distraction. With improvements as suggested above the use of wearable technology in the form of ‘connected eye wear’ warrants further exploration in the GP setting. References Department of Health A Framework for Technology Enhanced Learning. (2011). https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/215316/dh_131061.pdf. Bryman A. (2012). Social Research Methods. 4th edition. Oxford University Press. Oxford.

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 5

JO - BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning

JF - BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning

SN - 2056-6697

M1 - 5:A7-A8.

ER -