One, Two, Three: BBC Radio's formation of intercluded stations, from the Marriott Report (1957) to the present.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In early 1957 Richard Marriott (Assistant Director, Radio) led a working party in his name that determined the future of domestic radio in the face of commercial television's launch (1955-62). He concluded that radio would survive through music. The full range of music must be broadcast, he decided, but the stations must be vertically distinguishable through the canonic promotion of discrete genres. In this way he developed strands for particular types of popular music (Light/Radio 1), 'sweet' music (Light/Radio 2) and light classical music (Music Programme/Radio 3). The opposition and tactics of music department staff and the Musicians' Union, together with unanticipated events such as the Pilkington Report (1962) and the pirate radio stations (1964-7), formed fractures in Marriott's strategies that remain periodically obtrusive – in particular the employment of orchestras and the provision of music through intercluded services. This paper inspects the history of canonic music provision on BBC radio, examining the consequences for the corporation of incremental digitalisation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013
EventBiennial International Conference on Music Since 1900 - Liverpool Hope University, Liverpool, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Sep 201315 Sep 2013

Conference

ConferenceBiennial International Conference on Music Since 1900
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLiverpool
Period12/09/1315/09/13

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    Witts, R. (2013). One, Two, Three: BBC Radio's formation of intercluded stations, from the Marriott Report (1957) to the present.. Paper presented at Biennial International Conference on Music Since 1900, Liverpool, United Kingdom.