Nursing treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers in the community

Brenda Roe, J M Griffiths, M Kenrick, N A Cullum, J L Button

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A descriptive survey of current reported practice by 146 community nurses for their nursing treatment of leg ulcers was undertaken. Sixty-four per cent of nurses reported they would apply compression bandages to only venous ulcers; in only 23% of cases could the products described achieve an adequate level of compression. A variety of modern wound dressings were used by the nurses; 89% of nurses reported using a combination of different products layered over the ulcer. There is no evidence that this has any beneficial effect and could therefore be a potential waste of money, as well as contributing to allergic skin reactions. It would be useful if primary-health-care teams and Family Health Service Authority information pharmacists formulated protocols based upon effective treatments for patients with chronic leg ulcers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-168
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume3
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Leg Ulcer
Nursing
Nurses
Compression Bandages
Varicose Ulcer
Patient Care Team
Family Health
Therapeutics
Bandages
Pharmacists
Ulcer
Health Services
Primary Health Care
Hypersensitivity
Skin
Wounds and Injuries

Cite this

Roe, B., Griffiths, J. M., Kenrick, M., Cullum, N. A., & Button, J. L. (1994). Nursing treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers in the community. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 3(3), 159-168. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.1994.tb00381.x
Roe, Brenda ; Griffiths, J M ; Kenrick, M ; Cullum, N A ; Button, J L. / Nursing treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers in the community. In: Journal of Clinical Nursing. 1994 ; Vol. 3, No. 3. pp. 159-168.
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Roe, B, Griffiths, JM, Kenrick, M, Cullum, NA & Button, JL 1994, 'Nursing treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers in the community', Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 159-168. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2702.1994.tb00381.x

Nursing treatment of patients with chronic leg ulcers in the community. / Roe, Brenda; Griffiths, J M; Kenrick, M; Cullum, N A; Button, J L.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 3, No. 3, 1994, p. 159-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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