Local regeneration initiatives and capacity building: Whose ‘capacity’ and ‘building’ for what?

J. Diamond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The UK ‘New’ Labour Government has introduced a number of regional, local and neighbourhood initiatives. These claim to share similar characteristics based upon the concepts of ‘partnership’ and ‘multi-agency’ cooperation. New structures to ensure the accountability and the delivery of these ÔnewÕ forms of governance and service delivery have been established. Local Strategic Partnerships, with an emphasis on community ‘capacity’ building are the latest policy response. This paper, drawing upon research in Manchester and Glasgow, suggests that whilst these initiatives use a new language, they are steeped in old practices. Changing structures does not, of itself, alter the power differences inherent in local neighbourhoods where community groups are cast as ‘dependent’ by regeneration managers seeking to meet performance targets. The paper seeks to identify ways in which this relationship can be altered to enable local groups to negotiate a new agenda.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-189
JournalCommunity Development Journal
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2004

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capacity building
regeneration
New Labour
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labor
manager
governance
responsibility
language
performance
co-operation
policy
services
strategic alliance

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Local regeneration initiatives and capacity building: Whose ‘capacity’ and ‘building’ for what? / Diamond, J.

In: Community Development Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2, 01.02.2004, p. 177-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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