Landscapes of Fact and Fiction: Asian Theatre Arts in Britain

Barnaby King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In the first of two essays which use academic discourses of cultural exchange to examine the intra-cultural situation in contemporary British society, Barnaby King analyzes the relationship between Black arts and mainstream arts on both a professional and community level, focusing on particular examples of practice in the Leeds and Kirklees region in which he lives and works. This first essay looks specifically at the Asian situation, reviewing the history of Arts Council policy on ethnic minority arts, and analyzing how this has shaped - and is reflected in - current practice. In the context of professional theatre, he uses the examples of the Tara and Tamasha companies, then explores the work of CHOL Theatre in Huddersfield as exemplifying multi-cultural work in the community. He also looks at the provision made by Yorkshire and Humberside Arts for the cultural needs of their Asian populations. In the second essay, to appear in NTQ62, he will be taking a similar approach towards African-Caribbean theatre in Britain.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-33
JournalNew Theatre Quarterly
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2000

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Asia
Fiction
Theatre Arts
Art
Ethnic Minorities
Academic Discourse
Reviewing
Africa
Cultural Exchange
Yorkshire
Black Art
Art History
Leeds
Huddersfield

Cite this

King, Barnaby. / Landscapes of Fact and Fiction: Asian Theatre Arts in Britain. In: New Theatre Quarterly. 2000 ; Vol. 16, No. 1. pp. 26-33.
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Landscapes of Fact and Fiction: Asian Theatre Arts in Britain. / King, Barnaby.

In: New Theatre Quarterly, Vol. 16, No. 1, 2000, p. 26-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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