Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts

R. Foster, J. Groves

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This article explores how asylum seeker children can benefit both socially and academically from being placed in mainstream education even in a monocultural, white environment. The research presents a case study of one school and investigates the perspectives and experiences of teaching staff, asylum seeker pupils and the school's other pupils. The main findings are that for almost all the teachers, working with asylum seeker pupils was a new and unfamiliar challenge. Most had most strong, positive efforts to develop their understanding and skills, leading to increased confidence in their capacity to include asylum seeker pupils in lessons and thereby support the social and academic progress of these pupils. Consequently, asylum seeker pupils felt included in the school as they were being helped to develop their communication skills and were progressively able to participate as learners in lessons. The school's other pupils were generally welcoming and supportive towards the asylum seeker pupils (notwithstanding some instances of hostility and bullying). The experience of helping and supporting asylum seeker pupils and the insights gained from the contact with pupils from different countries and cultures has provided valuable learning in what it is to be a responsible citizen.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2004
EventCentre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference - University of Warwick, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Dec 2004 → …

Conference

ConferenceCentre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
Period25/12/04 → …

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asylum seeker
pupil
school
child benefit
communication skills
experience
exclusion
confidence
contact
citizen

Cite this

Foster, R., & Groves, J. (2004). Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts. Paper presented at Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference, United Kingdom.
Foster, R. ; Groves, J. / Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts. Paper presented at Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference, United Kingdom.
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Foster, R & Groves, J 2004, 'Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts' Paper presented at Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference, United Kingdom, 25/12/04, .

Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts. / Foster, R.; Groves, J.

2004. Paper presented at Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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T1 - Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts

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AU - Groves, J.

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N2 - This article explores how asylum seeker children can benefit both socially and academically from being placed in mainstream education even in a monocultural, white environment. The research presents a case study of one school and investigates the perspectives and experiences of teaching staff, asylum seeker pupils and the school's other pupils. The main findings are that for almost all the teachers, working with asylum seeker pupils was a new and unfamiliar challenge. Most had most strong, positive efforts to develop their understanding and skills, leading to increased confidence in their capacity to include asylum seeker pupils in lessons and thereby support the social and academic progress of these pupils. Consequently, asylum seeker pupils felt included in the school as they were being helped to develop their communication skills and were progressively able to participate as learners in lessons. The school's other pupils were generally welcoming and supportive towards the asylum seeker pupils (notwithstanding some instances of hostility and bullying). The experience of helping and supporting asylum seeker pupils and the insights gained from the contact with pupils from different countries and cultures has provided valuable learning in what it is to be a responsible citizen.

AB - This article explores how asylum seeker children can benefit both socially and academically from being placed in mainstream education even in a monocultural, white environment. The research presents a case study of one school and investigates the perspectives and experiences of teaching staff, asylum seeker pupils and the school's other pupils. The main findings are that for almost all the teachers, working with asylum seeker pupils was a new and unfamiliar challenge. Most had most strong, positive efforts to develop their understanding and skills, leading to increased confidence in their capacity to include asylum seeker pupils in lessons and thereby support the social and academic progress of these pupils. Consequently, asylum seeker pupils felt included in the school as they were being helped to develop their communication skills and were progressively able to participate as learners in lessons. The school's other pupils were generally welcoming and supportive towards the asylum seeker pupils (notwithstanding some instances of hostility and bullying). The experience of helping and supporting asylum seeker pupils and the insights gained from the contact with pupils from different countries and cultures has provided valuable learning in what it is to be a responsible citizen.

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Foster R, Groves J. Just because they don't speak English doesn't mean they're thick: factors influencing effective provision for asylum seeker pupils in white monocultural contexts. 2004. Paper presented at Centre for Educational Development, Appraisal and Research Conference, United Kingdom.