‘It’s a sixth sense...I see you, you see me, and we’ve been there’: Benefits and challenges of developing a peer mentoring scheme with young people in youth justice services

ANNA BUSSU, SEAN CREANEY, Jayne Price , Samantha Burns , Kierra Myles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to explore the development of peer mentorship within Youth Justice, including the value and utilisation of lived experience. Children and young people who have acquired specific experience of system contact can accrue experiential knowledge and become ‘experts by experience’. These children and young people are potentially capable of providing unique insights, which include sharing knowledge and experiences of navigating welfare and justice services. This research paper provides in-depth insight from an ongoing study about the experiences of those involved in delivering a peer mentoring scheme within a youth justice context. Data from semi-structured interviews with lived experienced peer mentors and practitioners were analysed using thematic analysis to explore participants' opinions, attitudes and beliefs regarding the design and development of a peer mentoring scheme. The article contributes to a conceptual understanding of the design and delivery of peer mentorship within youth justice.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Community Justice
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 18 Apr 2024

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