Investigating the encoding-retrieval match in recognition memory: Effects of experimental design, specificity, and retention interval

S. A Dewhurst, Lauren Knott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Five experiments investigated the encoding-retrieval match in recognition memory by manipulating read and generate conditions at study and at test. Experiments 1A and 1B confirmed previous findings that reinstating encoding operations at test enhances recognition accuracy in a within-groups design but reduces recognition accuracy in a between-groups design. Experiment 2A showed that generating from anagrams at study and at test enhanced recognition accuracy even when study and test items were generated from different anagrams. Experiment 2B showed that switching from one generation task at study (e.g., anagram solution) to a different generation task at test (e.g., fragment completion) eliminated this recognition advantage. Experiment 3 showed that the recognition advantage found in Experiment 1A is reliably present up to 1 week after study. The findings are consistent with theories of memory that emphasize the importance of the match between encoding and retrieval operations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1101-1109
JournalMemory & Cognition
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

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