Investigating the Differences in Motor Competence Across Levels of Neighbourhood Deprivation in School Children

RICHARD TYLER*, Stuart J. Fairclough, Lawrence Foweather, Kelly A Mackintosh, Gareth Stratton

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate deprivation differences in motor competence in school children. Methods: National data were captured on 4,491 children (49.1% boys; aged 11.4±0.6 years) as part of the Dragon Challenge (DC) assessment implementation across 4 regions in Wales, between November 2014 and 2016. Motor competence was measured using the DC which involves nine tasks, completed in a continuous circuit within a timed trial. Tasks require the application of different combinations of fundamental, combined and complex motor skills. Participants were scored on their technical quality, performance outcomes, and time. A total DC score was calculated, with a larger score displaying higher motor competence. Participants’ home postcodes or lower/middle super output areas (if home postcodes were missing) were used to calculate Welsh Index of Multiple Deprivation (WIMD; 2014) scores and WIMD quintiles (1=most deprived). A two-way ANCOVA investigated the effect of sex and WIMD quintiles on motor competence, adjusting for age and ethnicity. Results: There was a significant interaction between WIMD quintiles and sex on DC Score, while controlling for age and ethnicity (F(4,3627)=2.485, p=0.042). WIMD quintile was significant in girls (F(4,3627)=5.402, p<0.001) and boys (F(4,3627)=8.361, p<0.001). For girls, quintile 1 had a significantly lower adjusted mean DC score (31.00) than quintile 2 (1.83, CI 0.13 to 3.53; p=0.03), quintile 4 (2.57, CI 0.90 to 4.24; p<0.001), and quintile 5 (2.07, CI 0.26 to 3.87; p=0.01). For boys, adjusted mean DC score was significantly lower in quintile 1 (31.65) compare to quintile 3 (1.86, CI 0.24 to 3.48; p=0.01) and quintile 5 (3.46, CI 1.69 to 5.24; p<0.001); in quintile 2 (32.44) compared to quintile 5 (2.67, CI 0.85 to 4.50; p<0.001); and in quintile 4 (33.22) compared to quintile 5 (1.88, CI 0.05 to 3.71; p=0.04). No other significant differences in DC score between quintiles were found. Conclusion: The present study was one of the first large-scale studies to investigate differences in motor competence by sex and levels of deprivation. Overall, results showed that national inequalities exist and focused services are warranted, particularly for those living in the most deprived neighbourhoods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages754
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 12 Sep 2020
EventInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) 2020 Annual Meeting -
Duration: 12 Sep 2020 → …

Conference

ConferenceInternational Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA) 2020 Annual Meeting
Period12/09/20 → …

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