Imagine all the synchrony: The effects of actual and imagined synchronous walking on attitudes towards marginalised groups

Gray Atherton, Natalie Sebanz, Liam Cross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)
60 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Stereotyping is a pervasive societal problem that impacts not only minority groups but subserves individuals who perpetuate stereotypes, leading to greater distance between groups. Social contact interventions have been shown to reduce prejudice and stereotyping, but optimal contact conditions between groups are often out of reach in day to day life. Therefore, we investigated the effects of a synchronous walking intervention, a non-verbal embodied approach to intergroup contact that may reduce the need for optimal contact conditions. We studied attitude change towards the Roma group in Hungary following actual and imagined walking, both in a coordinated and uncoordinated manner. Results showed that coordinated walking, both imagined and in vivo, led to explicit and implicit reductions in prejudice and stereotyping towards both the Roma individual and the wider Roma social group. This suggests that coordinated movement could be a valuable addition to current approaches towards prejudice reduction.
Original languageEnglish
JournalPlosOne
Volume14
Issue number5
Early online date14 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 May 2019

Keywords

  • synchrony
  • pro-social behaviour
  • Attitudes
  • cooperation
  • Coordination
  • joint action

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