‘I like it here because they listen to us.’ The effect of vocal empowerment on disaffected 14–16-year-old girls.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This paper looks at the experiences of educationally disaffected 14—16-year-old girls undertaking vocational learning in an out-of-school environment, as part of a work-related learning programme. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews with female students, teachers, and vocational tutors, it is argued that these girls undergo deep self-reflective thinking and develop stronger self-awareness as a result of undertaking learning in an alternative environment. The overall environment is perceived as being apt to facilitate individual needs and to establish and develop student voice. Consequently, the girls are seen to be empowered and thus develop greater autonomy, indulge in deeper self-analysis, and amend their self-perspectives. Although the girls identify similar features between school and the vocational learning provider, each environment is conceptualised with significant differences. Vocal empowerment evidences stronger engagement in learning, improved attitudes to learning, and a perception of stronger self-objectivity.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 10 Mar 2014
EventAnnual Education Conference - Edge Hill University, Ormskirk, United Kingdom
Duration: 8 Jul 201410 Jul 2014

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Education Conference
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityOrmskirk
Period8/07/1410/07/14

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