"I know people think i'm a complete pain in the neck": An examination of the introduction of child protection and "safeguarding" in english sport from the perspective of national governing body safeguarding lead officers

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6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Child protection in sport emerged at the start of the 21st century amidst headlines about coaches raping, sexually assaulting and abusing children. Against this backdrop, in 2001 the UK government established an independent agency, the English Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), which introduced national child protection standards for sports organizations. This included the requirement to appoint national “safeguarding lead officers”. Utilizing the theoretical framework of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this paper considers the impact of “safeguarding and child protection” (SCP) within the English sports community through the experiences of those who have been at the vanguard of its implementation in the early years of its establishment within sport. Utilizing data from qualitative interviews with nine national safeguarding lead officers (SLOs), the paper discusses the challenges experienced by SLOs and critically appraises the relation between them (their habitus) and the prevailing logic (capital) within their sporting fields. We discuss the extent to which SLOs have been supported by their organizations and conclude with a consideration of the degree to which national governing bodies of sport (NGBs) have been invested in SCP.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)606-627
Number of pages22
JournalSocial Sciences
Volume3
Issue number4
Early online date26 Sep 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014

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child protection
pain
Sports
examination
coach
qualitative interview
sociologist
community
experience

Keywords

  • Bourdieu
  • Child protection
  • Habitus
  • Safeguarding
  • Sport

Cite this

@article{8e34922c5c6a4b4bab720d35ded4138a,
title = "{"}I know people think i'm a complete pain in the neck{"}: An examination of the introduction of child protection and {"}safeguarding{"} in english sport from the perspective of national governing body safeguarding lead officers",
abstract = "Child protection in sport emerged at the start of the 21st century amidst headlines about coaches raping, sexually assaulting and abusing children. Against this backdrop, in 2001 the UK government established an independent agency, the English Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), which introduced national child protection standards for sports organizations. This included the requirement to appoint national “safeguarding lead officers”. Utilizing the theoretical framework of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this paper considers the impact of “safeguarding and child protection” (SCP) within the English sports community through the experiences of those who have been at the vanguard of its implementation in the early years of its establishment within sport. Utilizing data from qualitative interviews with nine national safeguarding lead officers (SLOs), the paper discusses the challenges experienced by SLOs and critically appraises the relation between them (their habitus) and the prevailing logic (capital) within their sporting fields. We discuss the extent to which SLOs have been supported by their organizations and conclude with a consideration of the degree to which national governing bodies of sport (NGBs) have been invested in SCP.",
keywords = "Bourdieu, Child protection, Habitus, Safeguarding, Sport",
author = "Michael Hartill and Melanie Lang",
note = "1. Office for National Statistics. 2011 Census: Population Estimates for the UK 27 January 2011, London: Office for National Statistics, 2012. 2. Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Taking Part October 2011 to September 2012 Supplementary Child Report, London: Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2013. 3. Brackenridge, C. H. Spoilsports: Understanding and Preventing Sexual Exploitation in Sport, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 2001. 4. Lang, M. and Hartill, M. “Safeguarding and child protection in sport in England.” In Safeguarding, Child Protection and Abuse in Sport: International Perspectives in Research, Policy and Practice, 1st ed. Edited by M. Lang, M. Hartill. London: Routledge, 2014, pp.13-22. 5. Department for Education and Skills. Every Child Matters: Change for Children, London: Her Majesty’s Stationary Office, 2003. 6. Department for Education. Working Together to Safeguard Children: A Guide to Inter-Agency Working to Safeguard and Promote the Welfare of Children, London: Her Majesty’s Stationary Office, 2013. 7. Department for Culture, Media and Sport (2007) Culture, Sport, Play. Available from: http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/culturesportplay/ (Accessed 24 April 2012). 8. Brackenridge, C. H., Pitchford, A., Russell, K. and Nutt, G. Child Welfare in Football: An Exploration of Children’s Welfare in the Modern Game, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 2007. 9. Matthews, B. “Exploring the contested role of mandatory reporting laws in the identification of severe child abuse and neglect.” In Law and Childhood Studies, 1st ed. Edited by M. Freeman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, pp. 302-38. 10. Bringer, J. “Swimming Coaches’ Perceptions and the Development of Role Conflict and Role Ambiguity.” Ph.D. thesis, Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education, 2002. 11. White, C. A. “Progress Report on Child Protection Policy Development in English National Governing Bodies of Sport.” Paper presented to a workshop at the NSPCC National Training Centre, Leicester, 14th June 1999. 12. Independent Football Commission. Report on Child Protection in Football. Stockton-on-Tees: Independent Football Commission, 2005. 13. Boocock, S. “The Child Protection in Sport Unit.” In Sexual Harassment and Abuse in Sport: International Research and Policy Perspectives, 1st ed. Edited by C. H. Brackenridge, K. Fasting. London: Whiting & Birch, 2002, pp.133-43. 14. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, 1st ed. Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2003. 15. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, 2nd ed. Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2006. 16. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Sports Safeguarding Children Initiative: Mid-Project Progress Report, Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2013. 17. Brackenridge, C. “Coach-Swimmer Interaction: Traps, Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them.” Paper presented at the 16th FINA World Sports Medicine Congress, Manchester, April 2008. 18. Hartill, M. and Prescott, P. “Serious business or ‘any other business’? Safeguarding and child protection policy in British rugby league.” Child Abuse Review 16, no. 4 (2007): 237-51. 19. Brackenridge, C. H. “Problem? What Problem? Thoughts on a Professional Code of Practice for Coaches.” Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Association of National Coaches, Bristol, December 1986. 20. Brackenridge, C. H. “Sexual Abuse of Children in Sport: A Comparative Exploration of Research Methodologies and Professional Practice.” Paper presented at the Pre-Olympic Scientific Congress, Malaga, Spain, 14-19th July 1992. 21. Brackenridge, C. H. “Fair play or fair game: Child sexual abuse in sport organizations.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 29, no. 3 (1994): 287-99. 22. Curry, T. J. “Fraternal bonding in the locker room: A pro-feminist analysis of talk about competition and women.” Sociology of Sport Journal 8, no. 2 (1991): 119-35. 23. Donnelly, P. “Who’s fair game? Sport, sexual harassment and abuse.” In Sport and Gender in Canada, 1st ed. Edited by P. White, K. Young. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. 24. Fasting, K., Brackenridge, C. H. and Walseth, K. “Coping with sexual harassment in sport: Experiences of elite female athletes.” Journal of Sexual Aggression 8, no. 2 (2002): 16-36. 25. Hargreaves, J. Sporting Females: Critical Issues in the History and Sociology of Women’s Sport, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 1994. 26. Lenskyj, H. J. “Sexual harassment: Female athletes’ experiences and coaches’ responsibilities.” Coaching Association of Canada 12, no. 6 (1992). 27. Piper, H., Garratt, D. and Taylor, B. “Child abuse, child protection, and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching.” Sport, Education and Society 18, no. 5 (2013): 583-98. 28. Hartill, M. and O’Gorman, J. “Evaluation in safeguarding and child protection in sport.” In Safeguarding, Child Protection and Abuse in Sport: International Perspectives in Research, Policy and Practice, 1st ed. Edited by M. Lang, M. Hartill. London: Routledge, 2014, pp. 181-91. 29. Robson, C. Real World Research, 3rd ed. London: Sage, 2011. 30. Sturges, J. and Hanrahan, K. H. “Comparing telephone and face-to-face qualitative interviewing: A research note.” Qualitative Research, 4, no. 1 (2004): 107-18. 31. Greenfield, T. K., Midanik, L. T. and Rogers, J. D. “Effects of telephone versus face-to-face interview modes on reports of alcohol consumption.” Addiction, 95, no. 20 (2000): 277-84. 32. Rubin, H. J. and Rubin, I. S. Qualitative Interviewing: The Art of Hearing Data, 3rd ed. London: Sage, 2011. 33. Foddy, W. Constructing Questions for Interviews and Questionnaires: Theory and Practice in Social Research, 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. 34. Goertz, J. and LeCompte, M. Ethnography and Qualitative Design in Educational Research, 2nd ed. New York: Academic Press, 1993. 35. Johnson, B. and Christensen, L. B. Educational Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Approaches, 1st ed. London: Sage, 2012. 36. Lonne, B., Parton, N. Thomson, J. and Harries, M. Reforming Child Protection, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 2009. 37. Barton, A. and Welbourne, P. “Context and its significance in identifying ‘what works’ in child protection.” Child Abuse Review 14, no. 3 (2005): 177-94. 38. Child Protection in Sport Unit. The Framework for Maintaining and Embedding Safeguarding for Children In and Through Sport, 1st ed. Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2012. 39. Lloyd, C., King, R. and Chenoweth, L. “Social work, stress and burnout: A review.” Journal of Mental Health 11, no. 3 (2002): 255-65. 40. Health and Safety Executive (2009) Health and Safety Law. Available from: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/law.pdf (Accessed 30 June 2014). 41. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Specialist Safeguarding Training. Available from: https://thecpsu.org.uk/training-events/specialist-safeguarding-training/ (Accessed 26 June 2014). 42. Beck, U. Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity, 1st ed. London: Sage, 1992. 43. Downes, S. (7 April 2002) “Every parents’ nightmare.” Observer Sport Monthly. Available from: http://observer.theguardian.com/print/0,,4386620-103977,00.html (Accessed 4 January 2014). 44. Laird, S. E. Child Protection: Managing Conflict, Hostility and Aggression, 1st ed. Bristol: Polity Press, 2013. 45. Council of Europe. Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sport (EPAS). Available from: http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/epas/News/News_2013_Budapest_Conf_EN.asp (Accessed 21 December 2013). 46. 46 European Commission. EU Conference on Gender Equality in Sport. Available from: http://ec.europa.eu/sport/news/20131129_en.htm (Accessed 21 December 2013). 47. 47 United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace. Child Protection in Sport. Available from: http://www.un.org/wcm/content/site/sport/home/unplayers/memberstates/sdp_iwg_thematicwgs/pid/6412 (Accessed 5 January 2014).",
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T1 - "I know people think i'm a complete pain in the neck": An examination of the introduction of child protection and "safeguarding" in english sport from the perspective of national governing body safeguarding lead officers

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AU - Lang, Melanie

N1 - 1. Office for National Statistics. 2011 Census: Population Estimates for the UK 27 January 2011, London: Office for National Statistics, 2012. 2. Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Taking Part October 2011 to September 2012 Supplementary Child Report, London: Department for Culture, Media and Sport, 2013. 3. Brackenridge, C. H. Spoilsports: Understanding and Preventing Sexual Exploitation in Sport, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 2001. 4. Lang, M. and Hartill, M. “Safeguarding and child protection in sport in England.” In Safeguarding, Child Protection and Abuse in Sport: International Perspectives in Research, Policy and Practice, 1st ed. Edited by M. Lang, M. Hartill. London: Routledge, 2014, pp.13-22. 5. Department for Education and Skills. Every Child Matters: Change for Children, London: Her Majesty’s Stationary Office, 2003. 6. Department for Education. Working Together to Safeguard Children: A Guide to Inter-Agency Working to Safeguard and Promote the Welfare of Children, London: Her Majesty’s Stationary Office, 2013. 7. Department for Culture, Media and Sport (2007) Culture, Sport, Play. Available from: http://www.everychildmatters.gov.uk/culturesportplay/ (Accessed 24 April 2012). 8. Brackenridge, C. H., Pitchford, A., Russell, K. and Nutt, G. Child Welfare in Football: An Exploration of Children’s Welfare in the Modern Game, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 2007. 9. Matthews, B. “Exploring the contested role of mandatory reporting laws in the identification of severe child abuse and neglect.” In Law and Childhood Studies, 1st ed. Edited by M. Freeman. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, pp. 302-38. 10. Bringer, J. “Swimming Coaches’ Perceptions and the Development of Role Conflict and Role Ambiguity.” Ph.D. thesis, Cheltenham and Gloucester College of Higher Education, 2002. 11. White, C. A. “Progress Report on Child Protection Policy Development in English National Governing Bodies of Sport.” Paper presented to a workshop at the NSPCC National Training Centre, Leicester, 14th June 1999. 12. Independent Football Commission. Report on Child Protection in Football. Stockton-on-Tees: Independent Football Commission, 2005. 13. Boocock, S. “The Child Protection in Sport Unit.” In Sexual Harassment and Abuse in Sport: International Research and Policy Perspectives, 1st ed. Edited by C. H. Brackenridge, K. Fasting. London: Whiting & Birch, 2002, pp.133-43. 14. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, 1st ed. Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2003. 15. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Standards for Safeguarding and Protecting Children in Sport, 2nd ed. Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2006. 16. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Sports Safeguarding Children Initiative: Mid-Project Progress Report, Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2013. 17. Brackenridge, C. “Coach-Swimmer Interaction: Traps, Pitfalls and How to Avoid Them.” Paper presented at the 16th FINA World Sports Medicine Congress, Manchester, April 2008. 18. Hartill, M. and Prescott, P. “Serious business or ‘any other business’? Safeguarding and child protection policy in British rugby league.” Child Abuse Review 16, no. 4 (2007): 237-51. 19. Brackenridge, C. H. “Problem? What Problem? Thoughts on a Professional Code of Practice for Coaches.” Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the British Association of National Coaches, Bristol, December 1986. 20. Brackenridge, C. H. “Sexual Abuse of Children in Sport: A Comparative Exploration of Research Methodologies and Professional Practice.” Paper presented at the Pre-Olympic Scientific Congress, Malaga, Spain, 14-19th July 1992. 21. Brackenridge, C. H. “Fair play or fair game: Child sexual abuse in sport organizations.” International Review for the Sociology of Sport 29, no. 3 (1994): 287-99. 22. Curry, T. J. “Fraternal bonding in the locker room: A pro-feminist analysis of talk about competition and women.” Sociology of Sport Journal 8, no. 2 (1991): 119-35. 23. Donnelly, P. “Who’s fair game? Sport, sexual harassment and abuse.” In Sport and Gender in Canada, 1st ed. Edited by P. White, K. Young. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999. 24. Fasting, K., Brackenridge, C. H. and Walseth, K. “Coping with sexual harassment in sport: Experiences of elite female athletes.” Journal of Sexual Aggression 8, no. 2 (2002): 16-36. 25. Hargreaves, J. Sporting Females: Critical Issues in the History and Sociology of Women’s Sport, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 1994. 26. Lenskyj, H. J. “Sexual harassment: Female athletes’ experiences and coaches’ responsibilities.” Coaching Association of Canada 12, no. 6 (1992). 27. Piper, H., Garratt, D. and Taylor, B. “Child abuse, child protection, and defensive ‘touch’ in PE teaching and sports coaching.” Sport, Education and Society 18, no. 5 (2013): 583-98. 28. Hartill, M. and O’Gorman, J. “Evaluation in safeguarding and child protection in sport.” In Safeguarding, Child Protection and Abuse in Sport: International Perspectives in Research, Policy and Practice, 1st ed. Edited by M. Lang, M. Hartill. London: Routledge, 2014, pp. 181-91. 29. Robson, C. Real World Research, 3rd ed. London: Sage, 2011. 30. Sturges, J. and Hanrahan, K. H. “Comparing telephone and face-to-face qualitative interviewing: A research note.” Qualitative Research, 4, no. 1 (2004): 107-18. 31. Greenfield, T. K., Midanik, L. T. and Rogers, J. D. “Effects of telephone versus face-to-face interview modes on reports of alcohol consumption.” Addiction, 95, no. 20 (2000): 277-84. 32. Rubin, H. J. and Rubin, I. S. Qualitative Interviewing: The Art of Hearing Data, 3rd ed. London: Sage, 2011. 33. Foddy, W. Constructing Questions for Interviews and Questionnaires: Theory and Practice in Social Research, 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. 34. Goertz, J. and LeCompte, M. Ethnography and Qualitative Design in Educational Research, 2nd ed. New York: Academic Press, 1993. 35. Johnson, B. and Christensen, L. B. Educational Research: Quantitative, Qualitative, and Mixed Approaches, 1st ed. London: Sage, 2012. 36. Lonne, B., Parton, N. Thomson, J. and Harries, M. Reforming Child Protection, 1st ed. London: Routledge, 2009. 37. Barton, A. and Welbourne, P. “Context and its significance in identifying ‘what works’ in child protection.” Child Abuse Review 14, no. 3 (2005): 177-94. 38. Child Protection in Sport Unit. The Framework for Maintaining and Embedding Safeguarding for Children In and Through Sport, 1st ed. Leicester: Child Protection in Sport Unit, 2012. 39. Lloyd, C., King, R. and Chenoweth, L. “Social work, stress and burnout: A review.” Journal of Mental Health 11, no. 3 (2002): 255-65. 40. Health and Safety Executive (2009) Health and Safety Law. Available from: http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/law.pdf (Accessed 30 June 2014). 41. Child Protection in Sport Unit. Specialist Safeguarding Training. Available from: https://thecpsu.org.uk/training-events/specialist-safeguarding-training/ (Accessed 26 June 2014). 42. Beck, U. Risk Society: Towards a New Modernity, 1st ed. London: Sage, 1992. 43. Downes, S. (7 April 2002) “Every parents’ nightmare.” Observer Sport Monthly. Available from: http://observer.theguardian.com/print/0,,4386620-103977,00.html (Accessed 4 January 2014). 44. Laird, S. E. Child Protection: Managing Conflict, Hostility and Aggression, 1st ed. Bristol: Polity Press, 2013. 45. Council of Europe. Enlarged Partial Agreement on Sport (EPAS). Available from: http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/epas/News/News_2013_Budapest_Conf_EN.asp (Accessed 21 December 2013). 46. 46 European Commission. EU Conference on Gender Equality in Sport. Available from: http://ec.europa.eu/sport/news/20131129_en.htm (Accessed 21 December 2013). 47. 47 United Nations Office on Sport for Development and Peace. Child Protection in Sport. Available from: http://www.un.org/wcm/content/site/sport/home/unplayers/memberstates/sdp_iwg_thematicwgs/pid/6412 (Accessed 5 January 2014).

PY - 2014/12/1

Y1 - 2014/12/1

N2 - Child protection in sport emerged at the start of the 21st century amidst headlines about coaches raping, sexually assaulting and abusing children. Against this backdrop, in 2001 the UK government established an independent agency, the English Child Protection in Sport Unit (CPSU), which introduced national child protection standards for sports organizations. This included the requirement to appoint national “safeguarding lead officers”. Utilizing the theoretical framework of sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, this paper considers the impact of “safeguarding and child protection” (SCP) within the English sports community through the experiences of those who have been at the vanguard of its implementation in the early years of its establishment within sport. Utilizing data from qualitative interviews with nine national safeguarding lead officers (SLOs), the paper discusses the challenges experienced by SLOs and critically appraises the relation between them (their habitus) and the prevailing logic (capital) within their sporting fields. We discuss the extent to which SLOs have been supported by their organizations and conclude with a consideration of the degree to which national governing bodies of sport (NGBs) have been invested in SCP.

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KW - Habitus

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KW - Sport

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