“I don’t take orders from a lad wearing make-up” Zombie as Queer Metaphor in Dominic Mitchell’s In the Flesh.

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Abstract

This article examines Dominic Mitchell’s BBC Three’s supernatural drama series, In the Flesh (2013), as a metaphor for contemporary lesbian and gay politics, which in recent years has followed a reformist agenda on the basis that lesbians and gay men are, what Andrew Sullivan (1996) has called, ‘virtually normal’. However, it has been suggested by some queer theorists that being seen as virtually normal is not unproblematic, as it is predicated on a politics of toleration. Read as a metaphor for contemporary lesbian and gay politics, In the Flesh presents a warning of the uncritical acceptance of discourses of sexual progress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)299-314
Number of pages16
JournalCritical Studies in Television
Volume11
Issue number3
Early online date31 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 31 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • In the Flesh
  • Queer
  • Supernatural drama
  • Zombie

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