Hominin home ranges and habitat variability: exploring modern African analogues using remote sensing

Hannah J O'Regan, David M Wilkinson, Christopher G Marston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The palaeoanthropological literature contains numerous examples of putative home range sizes associated with various hominin species. However, the resolution of the palaeoenvironmental record seldom allows the quantitative analysis of the effects of different range sizes on access to different habitat types and resources. Here we develop a novel approach of using remote sensing data of modern African vegetation as an analogue for past hominin habitats, and examine the effects of different range sizes on the access to habitat types. We show that when the location of the ranges are chosen randomly then the number of habitat types within a range is surprisingly scale invariant – that is increasing range size makes only a very modest difference to the number of habitat types within an estimated hominin home range. However, when transects are placed perpendicular to a water body (such as a lake or river bank) it is apparent that the greatest number of habitats are seen near water bodies, and decline with distance. This suggests additional advantages to living by freshwater other than the obvious one associated with access to drinking water, and may indicate that the finding of hominins in fluvial and lacustrine deposits is not simply a taphonomic issue.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)238-248
JournalJournal of Archaeological Science: Reports
Volume9
Early online date5 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Aug 2016

Fingerprint

habitat
water
Habitat
Africa
Remote Sensing
bank
river
resources
Water

Keywords

  • Human evolution
  • Landscape
  • Savannah
  • Africa
  • Landsat
  • Pedogenic carbonate
  • Fraction of woody cover

Cite this

O'Regan, Hannah J ; Wilkinson, David M ; Marston, Christopher G. / Hominin home ranges and habitat variability: exploring modern African analogues using remote sensing. In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports. 2016 ; Vol. 9. pp. 238-248.
@article{564eb34101c2406cb7656800c1f8057f,
title = "Hominin home ranges and habitat variability: exploring modern African analogues using remote sensing",
abstract = "The palaeoanthropological literature contains numerous examples of putative home range sizes associated with various hominin species. However, the resolution of the palaeoenvironmental record seldom allows the quantitative analysis of the effects of different range sizes on access to different habitat types and resources. Here we develop a novel approach of using remote sensing data of modern African vegetation as an analogue for past hominin habitats, and examine the effects of different range sizes on the access to habitat types. We show that when the location of the ranges are chosen randomly then the number of habitat types within a range is surprisingly scale invariant – that is increasing range size makes only a very modest difference to the number of habitat types within an estimated hominin home range. However, when transects are placed perpendicular to a water body (such as a lake or river bank) it is apparent that the greatest number of habitats are seen near water bodies, and decline with distance. This suggests additional advantages to living by freshwater other than the obvious one associated with access to drinking water, and may indicate that the finding of hominins in fluvial and lacustrine deposits is not simply a taphonomic issue.",
keywords = "Human evolution, Landscape, Savannah, Africa, Landsat, Pedogenic carbonate, Fraction of woody cover",
author = "O'Regan, {Hannah J} and Wilkinson, {David M} and Marston, {Christopher G}",
note = "Ant{\'o}n, S.C., Leonard, W.R., Robertson, M.L. (2002) An ecomorphological model of the initial hominid dispersal from Africa. Journal of Human Evolution 43: 773-785. Ant{\'o}n, S.C., Swisher III, C.C. (2004) Early dispersals of Homo from Africa. Annual Review of Anthropology 33: 271-96. Ashley, G.M., Tactikos, J.C., Owen, R.B. (2009) Hominin use of springs and wetlands: Paleoclimate and archaeological records from Olduvai Gorge (~1.79-1.74Ma). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 272: 1-16. Barnard, C.C. (1999) Home range. In Carlow, P. (ed) Blackwell’s concise encyclopaedia of ecology. Blackwell Science, Oxford. Bezdek, J. C. Fuzzy mathematics in pattern classification, Ph.D. dissertation, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 1973. Bird RB, Bird DW, Codding BF, Parker CH, Jones JH. 2008. The ‘fire stick farming’ hypothesis : Australian Aboriginal foraging strategies, biodiversity, and anthropogenic fire mosaics. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 105 : 14796-14801. Blome, M.W., Cohen, A.S., Tryon. C.A., Brooks, A.S. (2012) The environmental context for the origins of modern human diversity: A synthesis of regional variability in African climate 150,000-30,000 years ago. Journal of Human Evolution 62: 563-592. Bowler, P.J. (1986) Theories of human evolution; a century of debate 1844-1944. Basil Blackwell, Oxford. Braun, D.R., et al. (2008) Oldowan behavior and raw material transport: perspectives from the Kanjera Formation. Journal of Archaeological Science 35: 2329-2345. Cerling, T.E., Wynn, J.G., Andanje, S.A., Bird, M.I., Kimutai Korir, D., Levin, N.E., Mace, M., Macharia, A.N., Quade, J., Remien, C.H. (2011) Woody cover and hominin environments in the past 6 million years. Nature 476, 51-56. Cihlar, J. Land cover mapping of large areas from satellites: status and research priorities. Internat. J. Remote Sens., 2000, 21, 1093-1114. Cihlar, J.; Latifovic, R.; Beaubien, J.; Guindon, B.; Palmer, M. Thematic mapper (TM) based accuracy assessment of a land cover product for Canada derived from SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) data. Can. J. Remote Sens. 2003, 29, 154–170. Clutton-Brock, T.H. and Harvey, P.H. (1984) Comparative approaches to investigating adaptation. In Krebs, J.R. and Davies N.B. (eds) Behavioural ecology and evolutionary approach. 2nd ed. Blackwell, Oxford. Pp 7-29. Copeland, S.R., Sponheimer, M., de Ruiter, D.J., Lee-Thorp, J.A., Codron, D., le Roux, P.J., Grimes, V., Richards, M.P. (2011) Strontium isotope evidence for landscape use by early hominins. Nature 474: 76-79. Duro, D. C.; Franklin, S. E.; Dube, M. G. Multi-scale object-based image analysis and feature selection of multi-sensor earth observation imagery using random forests, Internat. J. Remote Sens., 2012, 33, 4502–4526. Flannery, K.V. 1976. Chapter 5: The Village and its catchment area [and sections therein]. In: Flannery, K.V. (ed) The early Mesoamerican village. New York: Academic Press. pp. 91-130. Finlayson, C. (2014) The improbable primate. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Fleischmann, C. G.; Walsh, S. J. Multi-temporalAVHRR digital data: an approach for landcover mapping of heterogeneous landscapes. Geocarto International, 1991, 4, 5–20. Foley, R. (2001) The evolutionary consequences of increased carnivory in hominids. Pp. 305-331. In Stanford, C.B. & Bunn, H.T. (eds) Meat-eating and human evolution. Oxford University Press, USA. Grove, M. 2009. Hunter-gatherer movement patterns: causes and constraints. Journal of anthropological archaeology 28: 222-233. Habermann, J.M., Stanistreet, I.G., Stollhofen, H., Albert, R.M., Bamford, M.K., Pante, M.C., Njau, J.K., Masao, F.T. (2016) In situ ~2.0 Ma trees discovered as fossil rooted stumps, lowermost Bed I, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Journal of Human Evolution 90: 74-87. Harmand, S. (2009) Variability in raw material selectivity at the Late Pliocene sites of Lokalalei, West Turkana, Kenya. In: Hovers, E., Braun, D.R. (eds) Interdisciplinary approaches to the Oldowan. Springer, Dordrecht. pp. 85-97. Homer, C. G.; Ramsey, R. D.; Edwards, T. C. Jr; Falconer, A. Landscape cover- type modeling using a multi-scene Thematic Mapper mosaic. Photogramm. Eng. Rem. S. 1997, 63, 59–67. Juang, H.; Strittholt, J. R.; Frost, P. A.; Slosser, N. C. The classification of seral forest in the Pacific Northwest USA using Landsat ETM+ imagery. Remote Sens. Environ. 2004, 91, 320-331. Kroll, E.M., Isaac, G.Ll. (1984) Configurations of artifacts and bones at early Pleistocene sites in East Africa. In Hietala, H. (ed) Intrasite spatial analysis in archaeology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. pp. 4-31. Kullmer, O. (2007) Geological background of early hominid sites in Africa. In: Handbook of Palaeoanthropology Vol 1: Principles, Methods and Approaches. Henke, W. & Tattersall, I. (Eds) Springer, New York. pp. 339-356. Leonard, W.R., Robertson, M.L. (2000) Ecological correlates of home range variation in Primates: implications for hominid evolution. Pp. 628-648. In: Boinski, S. & Garber, P.A. (eds) On the move: how and why animals travel in groups. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. Levin, N.E., Quade, J., Simpson, S.W., Semaw, S., Rogers, M. (2004) Isotopic evidence for Plio-Pleistocene environmental change at Gona, Ethiopia. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 219, 93-110. Levin, N. E. (2013), Compilation of East Africa Soil Carbonate Stable Isotope Data. Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). doi:10.1594/IEDA/100231 Loveland, T. R.; Belward, A. S. The IGBP-DIS global 1km land cover data set, DISCover: first results, Internat. J. Remote Sens, 1997, 18, 3289-3295. Loveland, T. R.; Reed, B. C.; Brown, J. F.; Ohlen, D. O.; Zhu Z.; Yang, L.; Merchant, J. W. Development of a global land cover characteristics database and IGBP DISCover from 1km AVHRR data. Internat. J. Remote Sens., 2000, 21, 1303-1330. McGwire, K. C.; Fairbanks, D. H. K.; Estes, J. E. Examining regional vegetation associations using multi-temporal AVHRR imagery. Technical Papers of the ASPRS–ACSM Annual Convention, Albuquerque, USA, March 3–5 1992, Vol. 1, pp. 304–313. McNab, B.K. (2012) Extreme measures; the ecological energetics of birds and mammals. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. Magill, C.R., Ashley, G.M., Dom{\'i}nguez-Rodrigo, M., Freeman, K.H. (2016) Dietary options and behaviour suggested by plant biomarker evidence in early human habitat. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113: 2874-2879. Manning, A and Dawkins, M.S. (2012) An introduction to animal behaviour. 6th ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Mayaux, P.; Bartholom, E.; Cabral, A.; Cherlet, M.; Defourny, P.; Di Gregorio, A.; Diallo, O.; Massart, M., Nonguierma, A.; Pekel, J.F.; Pretorius, C.; Vancutsem, C.; Vasconcelos, M. The Land Cover Map for Africa in the Year 2000. GLC2000 database, European Commission Joint Research Centre, 2003. http://www-gem.jrc.it/glc2000. Milton, K., May, M.L. (1976) Body weight, diet and home range area in primates. Nature 259, 459-462. Morton, D.; Rowland, C.; Wood, C.; Meek, L.; Marston, C.; Smith, G.; Wadsworth, R.; Simpson, I.C. 2011. Final Report for LCM2007 - the new UK land cover map. Countryside Survey Technical Report No 11/07 NERC/Centre for Ecology & Hydrology 112pp. (CEH Project Number: C03259). Plummer, T. (2004) Flaked stones and old bones: Biological and cultural evolution at the dawn of technology. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 47: 118-164. Quade, J., Levin, N. (2013) east African hominin palaeoecology: isotopic evidence from palaeosols. In: Sponheimer, M., Lee-Thorp, J.A., Reed, K.E., Ungar, P.S. (eds) Early hominin palaeoecology. University Press of Colorado, Boulder. Quinn, R.L., Lepre, C.J., Feibel, C.S., Wright, J.D., Mortlock, R.A., Harmand, S., Brugal, J-P., Roche, H. (2013) Pedogenic carbonate stable isotopic evidence for wooded habitat preference of early Pleistocene tool makers in the Turkana Basin. Journal of Human Evolution 65: 65-78. Raichlen, D.A., Wood, B.M., Gordon, A.D., Mbulla, A.Z.P., Marlowe, F.W., Pontzer, H. (2014) Evidence of Levy walk foraging patterns in human hunter-gatherers. PNAS 111: 728-733. Roe, D. (1997) Summary and overview. In: Issac, G.Ll. (ed) Koobi Fora research project Volume 5: Plio-Pleistocene archaeology. Clarendon Press: Oxford. Pp. 544-567. Reynolds, S.C., Wilkinson, D.M., Marston, C.G. & O’Regan, H.J. (2015) The “Mosaic habitat” concept in human evolution: Past and present. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 70: 57-69. Torello-Raventos, M.,; Feldpausch, T.R.; Veenendaal ,E.; Schrodt, F.; Saiz, G.; Domingues ,T.F.; Djagbletey, G.; Ford, A.; Kemp, J.; Marimon, B.S.; Marimon, Jr B.H.; Lenza, E.; Ratter, J.A.; Maracahipes, L.; Quesada, C.A.; Ishida, F.Y.; Nardoto, G.B.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arroyo, L.; Bowman, D.M.J.S.; Compaore, H.; Davies, K.; Diallo, A,.; Fyllas, N.M.; Gilpin, M.; Hein, F.; Johnson, M.; Killeen, T. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Miranda, H.S.; Steininger, M.; Thomson, J.; Sykora, K.; Mougin, E.; Hieraux, P.; Bird, M.I.; Grace, J.; Lewis, S.L.; Phillips, O.L. and Lloyd, J. 2013. On the delineation of tropical vegetation types with an emphasis on forest/savannah transitions. Plant ecology and diversity, 6:101-137. Vita-Finzi, C., Higgs, E.S. 1970. Prehistoric economy in the Mount Carmel area of Palestine: site catchment analysis. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 36: 1-37. Wayman, J. P.; Wynne, R. H.; Scrivani, J. A.; Reams, G. A. Landsat TM-based forest area estimation using iterative guided spectral class rejection. Photogramm. Eng. Rem. S., 2001, 67, 1155–1166. White, T.D. (1988) The comparative biology of “robust” Australopithecus: clues from context. In: Grine, F.E. (ed.) The evolutionary history of the “robust” australopithecines. Aldine: New Brunswick. Pp. 449-484. Xie, Y.; Sha, Z. and Yu, M. Remote sensing imagery in vegetation mapping: a review. J. Plant Ecol-UK, 2008, 1, 9-23.",
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Hominin home ranges and habitat variability: exploring modern African analogues using remote sensing. / O'Regan, Hannah J; Wilkinson, David M; Marston, Christopher G.

In: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, Vol. 9, 05.08.2016, p. 238-248.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hominin home ranges and habitat variability: exploring modern African analogues using remote sensing

AU - O'Regan, Hannah J

AU - Wilkinson, David M

AU - Marston, Christopher G

N1 - Antón, S.C., Leonard, W.R., Robertson, M.L. (2002) An ecomorphological model of the initial hominid dispersal from Africa. Journal of Human Evolution 43: 773-785. Antón, S.C., Swisher III, C.C. (2004) Early dispersals of Homo from Africa. Annual Review of Anthropology 33: 271-96. Ashley, G.M., Tactikos, J.C., Owen, R.B. (2009) Hominin use of springs and wetlands: Paleoclimate and archaeological records from Olduvai Gorge (~1.79-1.74Ma). Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 272: 1-16. Barnard, C.C. (1999) Home range. In Carlow, P. (ed) Blackwell’s concise encyclopaedia of ecology. Blackwell Science, Oxford. Bezdek, J. C. Fuzzy mathematics in pattern classification, Ph.D. dissertation, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 1973. Bird RB, Bird DW, Codding BF, Parker CH, Jones JH. 2008. The ‘fire stick farming’ hypothesis : Australian Aboriginal foraging strategies, biodiversity, and anthropogenic fire mosaics. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 105 : 14796-14801. Blome, M.W., Cohen, A.S., Tryon. C.A., Brooks, A.S. (2012) The environmental context for the origins of modern human diversity: A synthesis of regional variability in African climate 150,000-30,000 years ago. Journal of Human Evolution 62: 563-592. Bowler, P.J. (1986) Theories of human evolution; a century of debate 1844-1944. Basil Blackwell, Oxford. Braun, D.R., et al. (2008) Oldowan behavior and raw material transport: perspectives from the Kanjera Formation. Journal of Archaeological Science 35: 2329-2345. Cerling, T.E., Wynn, J.G., Andanje, S.A., Bird, M.I., Kimutai Korir, D., Levin, N.E., Mace, M., Macharia, A.N., Quade, J., Remien, C.H. (2011) Woody cover and hominin environments in the past 6 million years. Nature 476, 51-56. Cihlar, J. Land cover mapping of large areas from satellites: status and research priorities. Internat. J. Remote Sens., 2000, 21, 1093-1114. Cihlar, J.; Latifovic, R.; Beaubien, J.; Guindon, B.; Palmer, M. Thematic mapper (TM) based accuracy assessment of a land cover product for Canada derived from SPOT VEGETATION (VGT) data. Can. J. Remote Sens. 2003, 29, 154–170. Clutton-Brock, T.H. and Harvey, P.H. (1984) Comparative approaches to investigating adaptation. In Krebs, J.R. and Davies N.B. (eds) Behavioural ecology and evolutionary approach. 2nd ed. Blackwell, Oxford. Pp 7-29. Copeland, S.R., Sponheimer, M., de Ruiter, D.J., Lee-Thorp, J.A., Codron, D., le Roux, P.J., Grimes, V., Richards, M.P. (2011) Strontium isotope evidence for landscape use by early hominins. Nature 474: 76-79. Duro, D. C.; Franklin, S. E.; Dube, M. G. Multi-scale object-based image analysis and feature selection of multi-sensor earth observation imagery using random forests, Internat. J. Remote Sens., 2012, 33, 4502–4526. Flannery, K.V. 1976. Chapter 5: The Village and its catchment area [and sections therein]. In: Flannery, K.V. (ed) The early Mesoamerican village. New York: Academic Press. pp. 91-130. Finlayson, C. (2014) The improbable primate. Oxford University Press, Oxford. Fleischmann, C. G.; Walsh, S. J. Multi-temporalAVHRR digital data: an approach for landcover mapping of heterogeneous landscapes. Geocarto International, 1991, 4, 5–20. Foley, R. (2001) The evolutionary consequences of increased carnivory in hominids. Pp. 305-331. In Stanford, C.B. & Bunn, H.T. (eds) Meat-eating and human evolution. Oxford University Press, USA. Grove, M. 2009. Hunter-gatherer movement patterns: causes and constraints. Journal of anthropological archaeology 28: 222-233. Habermann, J.M., Stanistreet, I.G., Stollhofen, H., Albert, R.M., Bamford, M.K., Pante, M.C., Njau, J.K., Masao, F.T. (2016) In situ ~2.0 Ma trees discovered as fossil rooted stumps, lowermost Bed I, Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania. Journal of Human Evolution 90: 74-87. Harmand, S. (2009) Variability in raw material selectivity at the Late Pliocene sites of Lokalalei, West Turkana, Kenya. In: Hovers, E., Braun, D.R. (eds) Interdisciplinary approaches to the Oldowan. Springer, Dordrecht. pp. 85-97. Homer, C. G.; Ramsey, R. D.; Edwards, T. C. Jr; Falconer, A. Landscape cover- type modeling using a multi-scene Thematic Mapper mosaic. Photogramm. Eng. Rem. S. 1997, 63, 59–67. Juang, H.; Strittholt, J. R.; Frost, P. A.; Slosser, N. C. The classification of seral forest in the Pacific Northwest USA using Landsat ETM+ imagery. Remote Sens. Environ. 2004, 91, 320-331. Kroll, E.M., Isaac, G.Ll. (1984) Configurations of artifacts and bones at early Pleistocene sites in East Africa. In Hietala, H. (ed) Intrasite spatial analysis in archaeology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. pp. 4-31. Kullmer, O. (2007) Geological background of early hominid sites in Africa. In: Handbook of Palaeoanthropology Vol 1: Principles, Methods and Approaches. Henke, W. & Tattersall, I. (Eds) Springer, New York. pp. 339-356. Leonard, W.R., Robertson, M.L. (2000) Ecological correlates of home range variation in Primates: implications for hominid evolution. Pp. 628-648. In: Boinski, S. & Garber, P.A. (eds) On the move: how and why animals travel in groups. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. Levin, N.E., Quade, J., Simpson, S.W., Semaw, S., Rogers, M. (2004) Isotopic evidence for Plio-Pleistocene environmental change at Gona, Ethiopia. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 219, 93-110. Levin, N. E. (2013), Compilation of East Africa Soil Carbonate Stable Isotope Data. Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). doi:10.1594/IEDA/100231 Loveland, T. R.; Belward, A. S. The IGBP-DIS global 1km land cover data set, DISCover: first results, Internat. J. Remote Sens, 1997, 18, 3289-3295. Loveland, T. R.; Reed, B. C.; Brown, J. F.; Ohlen, D. O.; Zhu Z.; Yang, L.; Merchant, J. W. Development of a global land cover characteristics database and IGBP DISCover from 1km AVHRR data. Internat. J. Remote Sens., 2000, 21, 1303-1330. McGwire, K. C.; Fairbanks, D. H. K.; Estes, J. E. Examining regional vegetation associations using multi-temporal AVHRR imagery. Technical Papers of the ASPRS–ACSM Annual Convention, Albuquerque, USA, March 3–5 1992, Vol. 1, pp. 304–313. McNab, B.K. (2012) Extreme measures; the ecological energetics of birds and mammals. University of Chicago Press, Chicago. Magill, C.R., Ashley, G.M., Domínguez-Rodrigo, M., Freeman, K.H. (2016) Dietary options and behaviour suggested by plant biomarker evidence in early human habitat. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113: 2874-2879. Manning, A and Dawkins, M.S. (2012) An introduction to animal behaviour. 6th ed. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Mayaux, P.; Bartholom, E.; Cabral, A.; Cherlet, M.; Defourny, P.; Di Gregorio, A.; Diallo, O.; Massart, M., Nonguierma, A.; Pekel, J.F.; Pretorius, C.; Vancutsem, C.; Vasconcelos, M. The Land Cover Map for Africa in the Year 2000. GLC2000 database, European Commission Joint Research Centre, 2003. http://www-gem.jrc.it/glc2000. Milton, K., May, M.L. (1976) Body weight, diet and home range area in primates. Nature 259, 459-462. Morton, D.; Rowland, C.; Wood, C.; Meek, L.; Marston, C.; Smith, G.; Wadsworth, R.; Simpson, I.C. 2011. Final Report for LCM2007 - the new UK land cover map. Countryside Survey Technical Report No 11/07 NERC/Centre for Ecology & Hydrology 112pp. (CEH Project Number: C03259). Plummer, T. (2004) Flaked stones and old bones: Biological and cultural evolution at the dawn of technology. Yearbook of Physical Anthropology 47: 118-164. Quade, J., Levin, N. (2013) east African hominin palaeoecology: isotopic evidence from palaeosols. In: Sponheimer, M., Lee-Thorp, J.A., Reed, K.E., Ungar, P.S. (eds) Early hominin palaeoecology. University Press of Colorado, Boulder. Quinn, R.L., Lepre, C.J., Feibel, C.S., Wright, J.D., Mortlock, R.A., Harmand, S., Brugal, J-P., Roche, H. (2013) Pedogenic carbonate stable isotopic evidence for wooded habitat preference of early Pleistocene tool makers in the Turkana Basin. Journal of Human Evolution 65: 65-78. Raichlen, D.A., Wood, B.M., Gordon, A.D., Mbulla, A.Z.P., Marlowe, F.W., Pontzer, H. (2014) Evidence of Levy walk foraging patterns in human hunter-gatherers. PNAS 111: 728-733. Roe, D. (1997) Summary and overview. In: Issac, G.Ll. (ed) Koobi Fora research project Volume 5: Plio-Pleistocene archaeology. Clarendon Press: Oxford. Pp. 544-567. Reynolds, S.C., Wilkinson, D.M., Marston, C.G. & O’Regan, H.J. (2015) The “Mosaic habitat” concept in human evolution: Past and present. Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 70: 57-69. Torello-Raventos, M.,; Feldpausch, T.R.; Veenendaal ,E.; Schrodt, F.; Saiz, G.; Domingues ,T.F.; Djagbletey, G.; Ford, A.; Kemp, J.; Marimon, B.S.; Marimon, Jr B.H.; Lenza, E.; Ratter, J.A.; Maracahipes, L.; Quesada, C.A.; Ishida, F.Y.; Nardoto, G.B.; Affum-Baffoe, K.; Arroyo, L.; Bowman, D.M.J.S.; Compaore, H.; Davies, K.; Diallo, A,.; Fyllas, N.M.; Gilpin, M.; Hein, F.; Johnson, M.; Killeen, T. J.; Metcalfe, D.; Miranda, H.S.; Steininger, M.; Thomson, J.; Sykora, K.; Mougin, E.; Hieraux, P.; Bird, M.I.; Grace, J.; Lewis, S.L.; Phillips, O.L. and Lloyd, J. 2013. On the delineation of tropical vegetation types with an emphasis on forest/savannah transitions. Plant ecology and diversity, 6:101-137. Vita-Finzi, C., Higgs, E.S. 1970. Prehistoric economy in the Mount Carmel area of Palestine: site catchment analysis. Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society 36: 1-37. Wayman, J. P.; Wynne, R. H.; Scrivani, J. A.; Reams, G. A. Landsat TM-based forest area estimation using iterative guided spectral class rejection. Photogramm. Eng. Rem. S., 2001, 67, 1155–1166. White, T.D. (1988) The comparative biology of “robust” Australopithecus: clues from context. In: Grine, F.E. (ed.) The evolutionary history of the “robust” australopithecines. Aldine: New Brunswick. Pp. 449-484. Xie, Y.; Sha, Z. and Yu, M. Remote sensing imagery in vegetation mapping: a review. J. Plant Ecol-UK, 2008, 1, 9-23.

PY - 2016/8/5

Y1 - 2016/8/5

N2 - The palaeoanthropological literature contains numerous examples of putative home range sizes associated with various hominin species. However, the resolution of the palaeoenvironmental record seldom allows the quantitative analysis of the effects of different range sizes on access to different habitat types and resources. Here we develop a novel approach of using remote sensing data of modern African vegetation as an analogue for past hominin habitats, and examine the effects of different range sizes on the access to habitat types. We show that when the location of the ranges are chosen randomly then the number of habitat types within a range is surprisingly scale invariant – that is increasing range size makes only a very modest difference to the number of habitat types within an estimated hominin home range. However, when transects are placed perpendicular to a water body (such as a lake or river bank) it is apparent that the greatest number of habitats are seen near water bodies, and decline with distance. This suggests additional advantages to living by freshwater other than the obvious one associated with access to drinking water, and may indicate that the finding of hominins in fluvial and lacustrine deposits is not simply a taphonomic issue.

AB - The palaeoanthropological literature contains numerous examples of putative home range sizes associated with various hominin species. However, the resolution of the palaeoenvironmental record seldom allows the quantitative analysis of the effects of different range sizes on access to different habitat types and resources. Here we develop a novel approach of using remote sensing data of modern African vegetation as an analogue for past hominin habitats, and examine the effects of different range sizes on the access to habitat types. We show that when the location of the ranges are chosen randomly then the number of habitat types within a range is surprisingly scale invariant – that is increasing range size makes only a very modest difference to the number of habitat types within an estimated hominin home range. However, when transects are placed perpendicular to a water body (such as a lake or river bank) it is apparent that the greatest number of habitats are seen near water bodies, and decline with distance. This suggests additional advantages to living by freshwater other than the obvious one associated with access to drinking water, and may indicate that the finding of hominins in fluvial and lacustrine deposits is not simply a taphonomic issue.

KW - Human evolution

KW - Landscape

KW - Savannah

KW - Africa

KW - Landsat

KW - Pedogenic carbonate

KW - Fraction of woody cover

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DO - doi:10.1016/j.jasrep.2016.06.043

M3 - Article

VL - 9

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EP - 248

JO - Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports

JF - Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports

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