Health Interventions and Satisfaction with Services: A Comparative Study of Urinary Incontinence Sufferers Living in Two Health Authorities in England

B. Roe, K. Wilson, H. Doll

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

• This comparative study found that significantly more people with severe incontinence had contacted a health professional than had those with slight to moderate incontinence (P=0.00008). There was a significant linear trend towards people with severe incontinence seeing a health professional (P=0.00007). • The majority of people who were incontinent had not been asked to complete a bladder chart, which is an essential requirement for assessment and diagnosis of the type of incontinence and the subsequent health interventions that are offered. • Significantly more people in the health authority with an established continence advisory service had completed a bladder chart, had received physiotherapy and currently undertook pelvic floor muscle exercises than did those in the health authority without a continence service. • The majority of sufferers did not use any aids or appliances. Of those who did use incontinence aids, a majority bought their own. There was a significant linear trend for increased pad usage with increasing severity of incontinence (P=0.0003). • Significantly more people in the health authority with the continence service were satisfied with their healthcare and services, while more of those in the health authority without a service were unsatisfied (P=0.005). Significantly more people in the health authority without a service felt that healthcare and services could be improved (P=0.00001). • Significantly more people with severe incontinence were dissatisfied with services than were those with slight to moderate incontinence (P=0.01).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)792-800
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume9
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2000

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Urinary Incontinence
England
Health
Urinary Bladder
Delivery of Health Care
Pelvic Floor
Consultants
Exercise
Muscles

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abstract = "• This comparative study found that significantly more people with severe incontinence had contacted a health professional than had those with slight to moderate incontinence (P=0.00008). There was a significant linear trend towards people with severe incontinence seeing a health professional (P=0.00007). • The majority of people who were incontinent had not been asked to complete a bladder chart, which is an essential requirement for assessment and diagnosis of the type of incontinence and the subsequent health interventions that are offered. • Significantly more people in the health authority with an established continence advisory service had completed a bladder chart, had received physiotherapy and currently undertook pelvic floor muscle exercises than did those in the health authority without a continence service. • The majority of sufferers did not use any aids or appliances. Of those who did use incontinence aids, a majority bought their own. There was a significant linear trend for increased pad usage with increasing severity of incontinence (P=0.0003). • Significantly more people in the health authority with the continence service were satisfied with their healthcare and services, while more of those in the health authority without a service were unsatisfied (P=0.005). Significantly more people in the health authority without a service felt that healthcare and services could be improved (P=0.00001). • Significantly more people with severe incontinence were dissatisfied with services than were those with slight to moderate incontinence (P=0.01).",
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Health Interventions and Satisfaction with Services: A Comparative Study of Urinary Incontinence Sufferers Living in Two Health Authorities in England. / Roe, B.; Wilson, K.; Doll, H.

In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, Vol. 9, No. 5, 09.2000, p. 792-800.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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