‘Greedy landlord’ stereotype is not true for all in private sector – some use power responsibly

Kim McKee, Emma Bimpson, Tom Simcock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The Private Rented Sector has a negative reputation of being insecure, unaffordable, and low quality. The growth and diversification of the PRS has encouraged some private landlords to adopt a more social and ethical role. Whilst profit-led or altruistic motivations are difficult to disentangle, and the sector has evolved in different ways in different places, a visible ‘ethics of care’ nonetheless challenges entrenched stereotypes of the ‘greedy’ landlord, who is more interested in property as an investment, rather than people’s home. We seek to highlight this emerging evidence base and bring more nuance to understandings of the PRS. At the same time, we also acknowledge constraints in encouraging more widespread adoption of this approach.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Cities
  • Housing
  • Landlord
  • UK housing
  • Rental housing
  • Rental market
  • Private rental
  • Rent

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of '‘Greedy landlord’ stereotype is not true for all in private sector – some use power responsibly'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this