General Practitioner (GP) trainees experience of a 1-h protected supervision model given during psychiatry placements in the United Kingdom

Gareth Thomas, Helen McNeill

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Abstract

Background A‘1 - hour protected supervision model’ is well established for Psychiatry trainees. This model is also extended to GP trainees who are on placement in psychiatry. Aim: To explore the experiences of the ‘1-hour protected supervision model’ for GP trainees in psychiatry placements in the UK. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, an anonymous online questionnaire was sent to GP trainees in the North West of England who had completed a placement in Psychiatry between February and August 2015. Results Discussing clinical cases whilst using the e-portfolio was the most useful learning event in this model. Patient care can potentially improve if a positive relationship develops between trainee/supervisor, which is impacted by the knowledge of this model at the st art of the placement. Trainees found that clinical pressures were impacting on the occurrence of supervision. Conclusion The model works best when both GP trainees and their supervisors understand the model. The most frequently used and educationally beneficial aspect for GP trainees in psychiatry is the exploration of clinical cases using the learning portfolio as an educational tool. For effective delivery of this model of supervision, organisations must reflect on the balance between service delivery and allowing the supervisor and trainee adequate time for it to occur.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEducation for Primary Care
Early online date5 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

General Practitioners
Psychiatry
Learning
Art
England
Patient Care
United Kingdom
Pressure

Keywords

  • General practice
  • psychiatry
  • learning
  • supervision
  • trainee

Cite this

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title = "General Practitioner (GP) trainees experience of a 1-h protected supervision model given during psychiatry placements in the United Kingdom",
abstract = "Background A‘1 - hour protected supervision model’ is well established for Psychiatry trainees. This model is also extended to GP trainees who are on placement in psychiatry. Aim: To explore the experiences of the ‘1-hour protected supervision model’ for GP trainees in psychiatry placements in the UK. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, an anonymous online questionnaire was sent to GP trainees in the North West of England who had completed a placement in Psychiatry between February and August 2015. Results Discussing clinical cases whilst using the e-portfolio was the most useful learning event in this model. Patient care can potentially improve if a positive relationship develops between trainee/supervisor, which is impacted by the knowledge of this model at the st art of the placement. Trainees found that clinical pressures were impacting on the occurrence of supervision. Conclusion The model works best when both GP trainees and their supervisors understand the model. The most frequently used and educationally beneficial aspect for GP trainees in psychiatry is the exploration of clinical cases using the learning portfolio as an educational tool. For effective delivery of this model of supervision, organisations must reflect on the balance between service delivery and allowing the supervisor and trainee adequate time for it to occur.",
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N2 - Background A‘1 - hour protected supervision model’ is well established for Psychiatry trainees. This model is also extended to GP trainees who are on placement in psychiatry. Aim: To explore the experiences of the ‘1-hour protected supervision model’ for GP trainees in psychiatry placements in the UK. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, an anonymous online questionnaire was sent to GP trainees in the North West of England who had completed a placement in Psychiatry between February and August 2015. Results Discussing clinical cases whilst using the e-portfolio was the most useful learning event in this model. Patient care can potentially improve if a positive relationship develops between trainee/supervisor, which is impacted by the knowledge of this model at the st art of the placement. Trainees found that clinical pressures were impacting on the occurrence of supervision. Conclusion The model works best when both GP trainees and their supervisors understand the model. The most frequently used and educationally beneficial aspect for GP trainees in psychiatry is the exploration of clinical cases using the learning portfolio as an educational tool. For effective delivery of this model of supervision, organisations must reflect on the balance between service delivery and allowing the supervisor and trainee adequate time for it to occur.

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