Floor apportionment and gaze in conversational dyads

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The relationship between gaze & floor-switching has not been well understood. The monitoring & signaling functions of gaze may be distinguishable by finding a relationship between gaze & floor-switching both at the points of complete & incomplete utterances. Three-hour-long interactions with a graduate student & an undergraduate were videotaped, & a fourth involved two faculty members interacting in a lengthy seminar. All Ss were aware that they were being filmed. Middle sections of the tapes were used for analysis, & all 5 Ss were M. The presence of gaze did not lead to a significant increase in the incidence of short switching pauses, & significantly more immediate speaker switches were found when gaze did not occur. There were also significantly more immediate & short latency responses to questions terminating without gaze than with gaze. Questions terminating with gaze were judged to be more difficult than questions without gaze. No evidence of a floor-apportionment function of gaze was obtained. 4 Tables. Modified HA.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-15
Number of pages9
JournalBritish Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 1978

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title = "Floor apportionment and gaze in conversational dyads",
abstract = "The relationship between gaze & floor-switching has not been well understood. The monitoring & signaling functions of gaze may be distinguishable by finding a relationship between gaze & floor-switching both at the points of complete & incomplete utterances. Three-hour-long interactions with a graduate student & an undergraduate were videotaped, & a fourth involved two faculty members interacting in a lengthy seminar. All Ss were aware that they were being filmed. Middle sections of the tapes were used for analysis, & all 5 Ss were M. The presence of gaze did not lead to a significant increase in the incidence of short switching pauses, & significantly more immediate speaker switches were found when gaze did not occur. There were also significantly more immediate & short latency responses to questions terminating without gaze than with gaze. Questions terminating with gaze were judged to be more difficult than questions without gaze. No evidence of a floor-apportionment function of gaze was obtained. 4 Tables. Modified HA.",
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Floor apportionment and gaze in conversational dyads. / Beattie, Geoffrey W.

In: British Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, Vol. 17, No. 1, 02.1978, p. 7-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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