First year medical students’ attachment style, emotional intelligence and communication skills.

M G Cherry, I Fletcher, Peter leadbetter, H O'sullivan

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of EI on the relationship between medical students’ attachment style and clinical communication. Medical students completed measures of attachment (using the Experiences in Close Relationships–Short Form [ECR-SF]) and EI (using the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test [MSCEIT], a measure of the perception, use, understanding and management of emotions) at the end of Year 1, prior to a their clinical communication examination (OSCE). Attachment avoidance was significantly negatively correlated with total EI scores; total EI was significantly positively correlated with OSCE scores. As evidence suggests that attachment EI can be developed through the use of targeted interventions in medical school, this has potential implications for the training of medical students in clinical communication.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 22 Apr 2011
EventAssociation for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting - Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 13 Jul 201115 Jul 2011

Conference

ConferenceAssociation for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period13/07/1115/07/11

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Cherry, M. G., Fletcher, I., leadbetter, P., & O'sullivan, H. (Accepted/In press). First year medical students’ attachment style, emotional intelligence and communication skills.. Paper presented at Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
Cherry, M G ; Fletcher, I ; leadbetter, Peter ; O'sullivan, H. / First year medical students’ attachment style, emotional intelligence and communication skills. Paper presented at Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.
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Cherry, MG, Fletcher, I, leadbetter, P & O'sullivan, H 2011, 'First year medical students’ attachment style, emotional intelligence and communication skills.' Paper presented at Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 13/07/11 - 15/07/11, .

First year medical students’ attachment style, emotional intelligence and communication skills. / Cherry, M G; Fletcher, I; leadbetter, Peter; O'sullivan, H.

2011. Paper presented at Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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AU - O'sullivan, H

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Cherry MG, Fletcher I, leadbetter P, O'sullivan H. First year medical students’ attachment style, emotional intelligence and communication skills.. 2011. Paper presented at Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME) Annual Scientific Meeting, Edinburgh, United Kingdom.