Factors influencing optimum countermovement jump performance and movement strategy in Championship professional football players: Implications for player profiling

MATT GREIG, Andy Mitchell, Craig Holding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Single leg countermovement jump (CMJ) is a common profiling test influenced by sport, age, sex and playing level. Controlling for these confounding variables, outfield players from an English Championship squad (n=36) were retrospectively categorised as best (n=10) or worst (n=10), based on mean single leg CMJ height and flight time:contraction time ratio. Movement strategy was quantified as force-time history metrics differentiating eccentric and concentric phases. Jump height revealed that best performers elicited greater rate of force development in both phases (P ≤ 0.033), with concentric impulse the strongest predictor of performance. Time ratio also differentiated best performers as utilising a shallower (P = 0.002) countermovement, with concentric rate of force development the strongest predictor of good performance. Successful jump height performance can mask ineffectual eccentric and stretch shortening cycle neuromuscular characteristics. Time ratio is therefore advocated as the key performance indicator, with movement strategy prioritised over gross outcome measures.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages11
JournalResearch in Sports Medicine: An International Journal
Early online date10 Dec 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • neuromuscular performance
  • soccer
  • rehabilitation
  • profiling
  • optimum performance

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Factors influencing optimum countermovement jump performance and movement strategy in Championship professional football players: Implications for player profiling'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this