Factors Associated with Trust in Public Authorities Among Adults in Norway, United Kingdom, United States, and Australia Two Years after the COVID-19 Outbreak

Daicia Price, Tore Bonsaksen, Janni Leung, Caitlin McClure-Thomas, Mary Ruffolo, Gary Lamph, Isaac Kabelenga, Amy Ostertun Geirdal

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Abstract

Objectives: This study aimed to examine the levels of trust in information provided by public authorities 2 years after the COVID-19 outbreak and to examine factors associated with trust. Methods: Using a cross-national approach, online survey data was collected from four Western countries—Australia, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Differences in reports of very low or low levels of trust were examined by age, gender, area of residence, and the highest level of education in the four countries. Results: Levels of trust in the public authorities’ information were highest among Norwegian respondents and lowest among U.K. respondents. Lower levels of trust in public authorities were found among males, individuals living in rural or remote areas, and those with lower levels of education. Conclusion: The outcomes contribute to knowledge regarding differences between sociodemographic groups and countries regarding the levels of trust people have in public authorities’ information concerning a crisis, such as COVID-19. Strategies to promote trust in societies in different countries could consider these socio-demographic differences.
Original languageEnglish
Article number1605846
JournalInternational Journal of Public Health
Volume68
Early online date2 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2023

Keywords

  • Male
  • United States/epidemiology
  • Humans
  • Adult
  • Trust
  • COVID-19/epidemiology
  • Australia/epidemiology
  • Norway/epidemiology
  • United Kingdom/epidemiology
  • Disease Outbreaks

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