Everyday Sadism as a Predictor of Rape Myth Acceptance and Perception of Harassment

Ivonne A. Saravia Lalinde , NICHOLAS LONGPRE, Melissa de Roos

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Abstract

The #MeToo movement has stressed the need to understand why individuals who witness sexual violence may or may not take action. However, prevention programmes usually fail to address the association between personality traits and attitudes, perception, and behaviour in the context of sexual violence. To improve prevention programmes’ effectiveness, it is vital to understand how personality traits might interfere with willingness to engage in bystander intervention. This study aims to explore the relationships between Everyday Sadism, perception of harassment, Rape Myths and gender in a sample of 177 participants recruited online. Analyses revealed significant gender differences, with men endorsing more Rape Myths, perceiving less harassment, and being more sadistic. Gender and everyday sadism emerged as significant predictors of perception of harassment. In the case of Rape Myths, age emerged as an additional predictor. These results have several implications, ranging from expanding our knowledge of the influence of everyday sadism on factors known to modulate bystander behaviours as well as informing and shaping the development of prevention programmes.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Volume67
Issue number13-14
Early online date9 Apr 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Sadism
  • Dark Tetrad
  • Rape Myths
  • Harassment
  • Sexual Violence

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