Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity and Sport among Young People Aged 11-13 in East London, UK

Whitney Curry, Symeon Dagkas, Wilson Marcia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Due to the alarming increase in overweight/obesity among adolescents in the UK and in response to low levels of PAS (physical activity and sport), initiatives have been developed to promote PAS in vulnerable groups. The purpose of this study is: (1) to evaluate the effect of one such PAS initiative on 11-13 (n = 913) years old young people’s PAS patterns and participation; (2) to assess young peoples’ expectations and perceived benefits of the program; and (3) to make evidenced based recommendations for future interventions. Socio-demographic data, PAS data and perceptions of the program were assessed via questionnaire. Anthropometric data (height, weight, waist circumference) were also measured. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to test for significant differences between baseline and follow-up PAS data. McNemar chi-square tests were used to test for significance between baseline and follow-up expectations data. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed a reduction in total PAS (from 39% to 7%) from baseline to follow-up but five sports not currently offered through the national PE (physical education) curriculum (badminton, basketball, volleyball, cricket and rowing) saw an increase in participation. Young people’s perception of the program was positive, with a significant increase in those reporting the program helped them “be more sporty” and “be more healthy” (both significant at P < 0.05). While overall PAS did not increase, sports offered outside of those available as part of the national curriculum for PE were more popular; strengthening the case for further research and supporting the current trend of extending the sports available through PE in schools and school sports to positively contribute to increase in PAS. Future interventions should consider the target population more carefully in the design and implementation of such programs by offering culturally responsive PAS programs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)181-188
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Sports Science
Volume2
Early online date31 Dec 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Sports
evaluation
school
physical education
school sports
participation
education curriculum
adolescent
curriculum
questionnaire

Keywords

  • adolescent health
  • ethnicity
  • physical activity
  • sedentary time

Cite this

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title = "Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity and Sport among Young People Aged 11-13 in East London, UK",
abstract = "Due to the alarming increase in overweight/obesity among adolescents in the UK and in response to low levels of PAS (physical activity and sport), initiatives have been developed to promote PAS in vulnerable groups. The purpose of this study is: (1) to evaluate the effect of one such PAS initiative on 11-13 (n = 913) years old young people’s PAS patterns and participation; (2) to assess young peoples’ expectations and perceived benefits of the program; and (3) to make evidenced based recommendations for future interventions. Socio-demographic data, PAS data and perceptions of the program were assessed via questionnaire. Anthropometric data (height, weight, waist circumference) were also measured. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used to test for significant differences between baseline and follow-up PAS data. McNemar chi-square tests were used to test for significance between baseline and follow-up expectations data. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests showed a reduction in total PAS (from 39{\%} to 7{\%}) from baseline to follow-up but five sports not currently offered through the national PE (physical education) curriculum (badminton, basketball, volleyball, cricket and rowing) saw an increase in participation. Young people’s perception of the program was positive, with a significant increase in those reporting the program helped them “be more sporty” and “be more healthy” (both significant at P < 0.05). While overall PAS did not increase, sports offered outside of those available as part of the national curriculum for PE were more popular; strengthening the case for further research and supporting the current trend of extending the sports available through PE in schools and school sports to positively contribute to increase in PAS. Future interventions should consider the target population more carefully in the design and implementation of such programs by offering culturally responsive PAS programs.",
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Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention to Promote Physical Activity and Sport among Young People Aged 11-13 in East London, UK. / Curry, Whitney; Dagkas, Symeon; Marcia, Wilson.

In: Journal of Sports Science, Vol. 2, 2014, p. 181-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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