Emotional Understanding and Color-Emotion Associations in Children Aged 7-8 Years

Debbie J Pope, Hannah Butler, Pamela Qualter

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Abstract

An understanding of the development of emotional knowledge can help us determine how children perceive and interpret their surroundings and color-emotion associations are one measure of the expression of a child’s emotional interpretations. Emotional understanding and color-emotion associations were examined in a sample of UK school children, aged 7-8 years. Forty primary school children (mean age = 7.38; SD = 0.49) were administered color assessment and emotional understanding tasks, and an expressive vocabulary test. Results identified significant gender differences with girls providing more appropriate and higher quality expressions of emotional understanding than boys. Children were more able to link color to positive rather than negative emotions and significant gender differences in specific color preferences were observed. The implications of adult misinterpretations of color emotion associations in young children are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
JournalChild Development Research
Volume2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Dec 2012

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Emotions
emotion
Color
schoolchild
gender-specific factors
Language Tests
primary school
vocabulary
interpretation

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Pope, Debbie J ; Butler, Hannah ; Qualter, Pamela. / Emotional Understanding and Color-Emotion Associations in Children Aged 7-8 Years. In: Child Development Research. 2012 ; Vol. 2012.
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Emotional Understanding and Color-Emotion Associations in Children Aged 7-8 Years. / Pope, Debbie J; Butler, Hannah; Qualter, Pamela.

In: Child Development Research, Vol. 2012, 17.12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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