Emergency Care Impact Assessment (ECIA) Project: Exploring the impact of children’s hospice services upon hospice users and stakeholders.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

AIM To explore the impact of the planned and emergency care provided by a children’s hospice on children and young people with life-limiting conditions, their families and stakeholders to inform future service development. METHODOLOGY A two phase mixed-method qualitative and quantitative study with young people, families, health and social care professionals and hospice staff. Phase1 Semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n=53) Phase 2 Electronic survey (n=82) Total (n=135) ANALYSIS Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. SELECTED RESULTS • Families have limited or no other choice of alternative planned short breaks or emergency respite care provision when children’s hospice care is unavailable. • Families nor stakeholders had clear answers for how best to balance planned short breaks and emergency respite care provision, to enable the hospice to reach out to as many families as possible. • Participants spoke of genuine concerns about the lack of appropriate respite provision on children and family’s outcomes following discharge from the children’s hospice. CONCLUSION Families need regular respite and support to continue to be able to meet the child’s complex care needs. The lack of alternative respite care outside of and after children’s hospice discharge can have far reaching consequences for the child, family and society.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015
EventInternational Palliative Care Network - Online
Duration: 2 Nov 2015 → …

Conference

ConferenceInternational Palliative Care Network
Period2/11/15 → …

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Hospices
Emergency Medical Services
Respite Care
Hospice Care
Family Health
Child Care
Focus Groups
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care

Cite this

@conference{1d79a08c455b4fc6b5ab3373ab1ac9c6,
title = "Emergency Care Impact Assessment (ECIA) Project: Exploring the impact of children’s hospice services upon hospice users and stakeholders.",
abstract = "AIM To explore the impact of the planned and emergency care provided by a children’s hospice on children and young people with life-limiting conditions, their families and stakeholders to inform future service development. METHODOLOGY A two phase mixed-method qualitative and quantitative study with young people, families, health and social care professionals and hospice staff. Phase1 Semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n=53) Phase 2 Electronic survey (n=82) Total (n=135) ANALYSIS Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. SELECTED RESULTS • Families have limited or no other choice of alternative planned short breaks or emergency respite care provision when children’s hospice care is unavailable. • Families nor stakeholders had clear answers for how best to balance planned short breaks and emergency respite care provision, to enable the hospice to reach out to as many families as possible. • Participants spoke of genuine concerns about the lack of appropriate respite provision on children and family’s outcomes following discharge from the children’s hospice. CONCLUSION Families need regular respite and support to continue to be able to meet the child’s complex care needs. The lack of alternative respite care outside of and after children’s hospice discharge can have far reaching consequences for the child, family and society.",
author = "Tracy Mitchell and Katherine Knighting and Mary O'Brien and Barbara Jack and J. Sutherland-Oakes",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
language = "English",
note = "International Palliative Care Network ; Conference date: 02-11-2015",

}

Emergency Care Impact Assessment (ECIA) Project: Exploring the impact of children’s hospice services upon hospice users and stakeholders. / Mitchell, Tracy; Knighting, Katherine; O'Brien, Mary; Jack, Barbara; Sutherland-Oakes, J.

2015. Poster session presented at International Palliative Care Network, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

TY - CONF

T1 - Emergency Care Impact Assessment (ECIA) Project: Exploring the impact of children’s hospice services upon hospice users and stakeholders.

AU - Mitchell, Tracy

AU - Knighting, Katherine

AU - O'Brien, Mary

AU - Jack, Barbara

AU - Sutherland-Oakes, J.

PY - 2015/11

Y1 - 2015/11

N2 - AIM To explore the impact of the planned and emergency care provided by a children’s hospice on children and young people with life-limiting conditions, their families and stakeholders to inform future service development. METHODOLOGY A two phase mixed-method qualitative and quantitative study with young people, families, health and social care professionals and hospice staff. Phase1 Semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n=53) Phase 2 Electronic survey (n=82) Total (n=135) ANALYSIS Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. SELECTED RESULTS • Families have limited or no other choice of alternative planned short breaks or emergency respite care provision when children’s hospice care is unavailable. • Families nor stakeholders had clear answers for how best to balance planned short breaks and emergency respite care provision, to enable the hospice to reach out to as many families as possible. • Participants spoke of genuine concerns about the lack of appropriate respite provision on children and family’s outcomes following discharge from the children’s hospice. CONCLUSION Families need regular respite and support to continue to be able to meet the child’s complex care needs. The lack of alternative respite care outside of and after children’s hospice discharge can have far reaching consequences for the child, family and society.

AB - AIM To explore the impact of the planned and emergency care provided by a children’s hospice on children and young people with life-limiting conditions, their families and stakeholders to inform future service development. METHODOLOGY A two phase mixed-method qualitative and quantitative study with young people, families, health and social care professionals and hospice staff. Phase1 Semi-structured interviews and focus groups (n=53) Phase 2 Electronic survey (n=82) Total (n=135) ANALYSIS Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics. SELECTED RESULTS • Families have limited or no other choice of alternative planned short breaks or emergency respite care provision when children’s hospice care is unavailable. • Families nor stakeholders had clear answers for how best to balance planned short breaks and emergency respite care provision, to enable the hospice to reach out to as many families as possible. • Participants spoke of genuine concerns about the lack of appropriate respite provision on children and family’s outcomes following discharge from the children’s hospice. CONCLUSION Families need regular respite and support to continue to be able to meet the child’s complex care needs. The lack of alternative respite care outside of and after children’s hospice discharge can have far reaching consequences for the child, family and society.

M3 - Poster

ER -