Effective and Ineffective Management of Incontinence: Issues Around Illness Trajectory and Health Care

B. Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, findings from a study that investigated the impact of incontinence on individuals and the impact of effective and ineffective health interventions for the management of incontinence on patient careers and health care are reported. Twenty-seven participants whose incontinence was judged by health professionals as being successfully managed or unsuccessfully managed were interviewed. The participants were 19 women and 8 men (mean age: 61 years). Twenty-two participants experienced urinary incontinence, 4 people experienced both urinary and fecal incontinence, and 1 woman experienced fecal constipation. The findings have been set in the context of the management of chronic conditions and provide illuminating evidence that may be useful when reviewing health care and health services. People who were actively involved with their care and who were involved with decision making felt that their incontinence was being effectively managed. Multiple referrals and the marshaling and targeting of health professionals and services also appeared to be associated with effective management of incontinence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)677-690
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume10
Issue number5
Early online dateSep 2000
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2000

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Urinary Incontinence
Health Services
Delivery of Health Care
Fecal Incontinence
Health
Constipation
Decision Making
Patient Care
Referral and Consultation
carbosulfan

Cite this

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Effective and Ineffective Management of Incontinence: Issues Around Illness Trajectory and Health Care. / Roe, B.

In: Qualitative Health Research, Vol. 10, No. 5, 09.2000, p. 677-690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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