Does sexual identity and religious practice have implications for individual’s subjective health and wellbeing? Secondary data analysis of the Community Life Survey

Dean J. Wilkinson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The health and wellbeing of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) individual's has gained attention in recent years, particularly the unique stressors associated with health. Few studies have explored implications of sexual identity and religious status on mental health and wellbeing. A secondary data analysis was performed on the Community Life Survey. A multivariate interaction was found between age, religious practice and sexual identity when considering wellbeing. An ANOVA of wellbeing scores revealed a significant difference between sexual identity groups, LGBT group scoring lowest, with a significant interaction between religion and sexual identity. General health generated a significant difference between groups for religious practice. Understanding and challenging cultural norms in service settings is key for policy and practice. LGBT individuals' are at greater risk of lower wellbeing and increase dissatisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)563-577
Number of pages15
JournalMental Health, Religion and Culture
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2022

Keywords

  • mental health
  • religion
  • Sexuality
  • wellbeing

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does sexual identity and religious practice have implications for individual’s subjective health and wellbeing? Secondary data analysis of the Community Life Survey'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this