Developing rights-based standards for children having tests, treatments, examinations and interventions: using a collaborative, multi-phased, multi-method and multi-stakeholder approach to build consensus

Lucy Bray, Bernie Carter, Joann Kiernan, Ed Horowicz, Katie Dixon, James Ridley, Carol Robinson, Anna Simmons, Jennie Craske, Stephanie Sinha, Liza Morton, Begonya Nafria, Maria Forsner, Anna-Clara Rullander, Stefan Nilsson, Laura Darcy, Katarina Karlsson, Cath Hubbuck, Maria Brenner, Sian Spencer-LittleKath Evans, Andrew Rowland, Carol Hilliard, Jennifer Preston, Piet L Leroy, Damian Roland, Lisa Booth, Jean Davies, Holly Saron, Marie Edwinson Mansson, Ann Cox, Karen Ford, Steven Campbell, Julie Blamires, Annette Dickinson, Michael Neufeld, Blake Peck, Marla de Avila, Veronica Feeg, Henny Suzana Mediani, Maha Atout, Maureen D Majamanda, Natasha North, Christine Chambers, Fanny Robichaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (journal)peer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Children continue to experience harm when undergoing clinical procedures despite increased evidence of the need to improve the provision of child-centred care. The international ISupport collaboration aimed to develop standards to outline and explain good procedural practice and the rights of children within the context of a clinical procedure. The rights-based standards for children undergoing tests, treatments, investigations, examinations and interventions were developed using an iterative, multi-phased, multi-method and multi-stakeholder consensus building approach. This consensus approach used a range of online and face to face methods across three phases to ensure ongoing engagement with multiple stakeholders. The views and perspectives of 203 children and young people, 78 parents and 418 multi-disciplinary professionals gathered over a two year period (2020–2022) informed the development of international rights-based standards for the care of children having tests, treatments, examinations and interventions. The standards are the first to reach international multi-stakeholder consensus on definitions of supportive and restraining holds. Conclusion: This is the first study of its kind which outlines international rights-based procedural care standards from multi-stakeholder perspectives. The standards offer health professionals and educators clear evidence-based tools to support discussions and practice changes to challenge prevailing assumptions about holding or restraining children and instead encourage a focus on the interests and rights of the child. What is Known: • Children continue to experience short and long-term harm when undergoing clinical procedures despite increased evidence of the need to improve the provision of child-centred care. • Professionals report uncertainty and tensions in applying evidence-based practice to children’s procedural care. What is New: • This is the first study of its kind which has developed international rights-based procedural care standards from multi-stakeholder perspectives. • The standards are the first to reach international multi-stakeholder consensus on definitions of supportive and restraining holds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
JournalEuropean Journal of Pediatrics
Early online date11 Aug 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Aug 2023

Keywords

  • Child rights
  • Children
  • Consensus
  • Procedures
  • Restraint

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